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dc.contributor.authorWhatnall, M
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, J
dc.contributor.authorVerdejo-Garcia, A
dc.contributor.authorCarter, A
dc.contributor.authorBrown, RM
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, ZB
dc.contributor.authorDayas, CV
dc.contributor.authorHardman, CA
dc.contributor.authorLoxton, N
dc.contributor.authorSumithran, P
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, T
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-24T03:45:54Z
dc.date.available2021-06-24T03:45:54Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2076-328Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/bs11050060en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405320
dc.description.abstractThe symptoms of addictive eating are often debated, with some overlap in symptoms with substance addictions or other disorders such as binge eating disorder. This study explored the levels of agreement with symptoms of addictive eating among different health professions, the conditions they provide advice for, and the population group/s they work with. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted in February–April 2020 including 142 health professionals (87% female, 65% residing in Australia, 28% each working in private practice/hospital settings). Of these, 47% were dietitians, 20% psychologists/psychotherapists/counsellors, 16% other health practitioners (e.g., social workers), 13% health researchers, and 5% medical professionals. Agreement with 11 statements relating to addictive eating symptoms was assessed on a scale of 1/strongly disagree to 5/strongly agree (e.g., certain foods produce physiological effects in the brain rewards system). Differences in agreement by health profession were assessed by one-way analysis of variance. There were significant differences in agreement with individual statements between health professions. Psychologists, psychotherapists, and counsellors reported lower agreement to statements relating to physiological effects in the reward system, withdrawal symptoms, and over-eating to alleviate stress/anxiety, than other professions (p < 0.05). Those providing advice for disordered eating only reported lower agreement across statements compared with those providing advice for overweight/obesity or both (p < 0.001). There were minimal differences based on the population group/s that health professionals work with. There is some agreement among health professionals regarding addictive eating symptoms, however, this differs by profession and the conditions they treat. This study provides a novel perspective on health professionals’ views on addictive eating symptoms, and there is a need for more research to explore the concepts further.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom60en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBehavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702en_US
dc.subject.keywordsaddictive eatingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsclinicianen_US
dc.subject.keywordsfood addictionen_US
dc.subject.keywordshealth professionalen_US
dc.titleSymptoms of addictive eating: What do different health professions think?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWhatnall, M; Skinner, J; Verdejo-Garcia, A; Carter, A; Brown, RM; Andrews, ZB; Dayas, CV; Hardman, CA; Loxton, N; Sumithran, P; Burrows, T, Symptoms of addictive eating: What do different health professions think?, Behavioral Sciences, 2021, 11 (5), pp. 60en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-04-23
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-06-24T03:34:27Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly citeden_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLoxton, Natalie J.


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