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dc.contributor.authorHawgood, Jacinta
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Alan
dc.contributor.authorQuinnett, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diego
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-30T22:45:07Z
dc.date.available2021-06-30T22:45:07Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0227-5910
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/0227-5910/a000794
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405518
dc.description.abstractGatekeeper training (GKT) is one of the most widely used suicide prevention strategies. It involves training people who are not necessarily clinicians to be able to identify people experiencing suicidality and refer them to appropriate services. While there is a dearth of research that supports the causal link between GKT and reduced suicide rates, this is likely the result of a variety of factors including training design, definitions of “gatekeepers,” differing populations in which the gatekeeper (GK) operates, and other variables that may influence suicide rates. Despite this, research suggests that GKT improves people's knowledge, skills, and confidence in helping individuals who experience suicidal ideation and enhances positive beliefs about the efficacy of suicide prevention. However, there is no consensus on GK competencies to allow differences in effectiveness between various training programs to be measured, that is, knowledge, skills and abilities, attitudes, and self-efficacy attributes expected of a person resulting from the training. This paper discusses challenges in developing GK competencies. It uses developments in suicide prevention competencies for clinicians, vocational education, and training sector competencies, as well as empirical work in GKT, to propose minimum GK competencies that may be examined for further research and evaluation of programs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherHogrefe Publishing Group
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrisis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1607
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2001
dc.titleGatekeeper Training and Minimum Standards of Competency: Essentials for the Suicide Prevention Workforce
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHawgood, J; Woodward, A; Quinnett, P; De Leo, D, Gatekeeper Training and Minimum Standards of Competency: Essentials for the Suicide Prevention Workforce, Crisis, 2021
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-06-30T22:15:15Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 The Author(s). Distributed as a Hogrefe OpenMind article under the license CC BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHawgood, Jacinta L.
gro.griffith.authorDe Leo, Diego


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