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dc.contributor.authorRoennfeldt, H
dc.contributor.authorByrne, L
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-05T23:13:44Z
dc.date.available2021-07-05T23:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1445-8330en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/inm.12898en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405528
dc.description.abstractThe lived experience workforce has moved from being a grassroots support and activist movement to become the fastest growing workforce within mental health. As lived experience work becomes assimilated within mainstream mental health service delivery, it faces mounting pressure to become more professionalized. Professionalization has evoked both optimism and fear, with diverging views within the lived experience workforce. In this paper, an assessment of the existing professionalization of the lived experience workforce is undertaken by drawing on theoretical positions and indices of what constitutes a profession. The arguments for and against professionalization are explored to identify the risks, benefits, and considerations for the lived experience workforce. The drive for professionalization has largely occurred due to the clinically focused mental health systems’ valuing of professional identity. The argument in favour of professionalization is motivated by a need for credibility within the views of that system, as well as greater regulation of the workforce. However, tensions are acknowledged with concerns that professionalization to appeal to the clinically focused system may lead to erosion of the values and uniqueness of lived experience work and nullify its effectiveness as an alternative and complementary role. Given mental health nurses are increasingly colleagues and often line managers of lived experience workers, it is important at this stage of lived experience workforce development that mental health nurses understand and are able to advocate for lived experience roles as a distinct professional discipline to help avoid the risks of co-option to more dominant clinical practice.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.titleSkin in the game: The professionalization of lived experience roles in mental healthen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRoennfeldt, H; Byrne, L, Skin in the game: The professionalization of lived experience roles in mental health, International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 2021en_US
dc.date.updated2021-06-29T01:16:26Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Skin in the game: The professionalization of lived experience roles in mental health, International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 2021, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12898. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRoennfeldt, Helena L.


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