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dc.contributor.authorWardrop, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorRanse, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-05T23:35:35Z
dc.date.available2021-07-05T23:35:35Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1752-928X
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jflm.2021.102198
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405529
dc.description.abstractBackground: People detained in short-term custodial settings can require health care that may necessitate transfer to an Emergency Department (ED). What and how health care is delivered to detainees in short-term custodial settings may influence their health outcomes. Objective: The aim of this scoping review was to synthesise and critically appraise the evidence on health care delivered to detainees in short-term custody settings. Design: A scoping review was undertaken. Five online databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, Embase and Criminal Justice Database) were searched from January 2010 to May 2020. Data extracted pertained to the structures, processes and outcomes of health care delivery. The Mixed Methods Assessment Tool was used to quality appraise the studies. Deductive analysis was used to sort the findings into structures, processes and outcomes of health care delivery and then thematic analysis was undertaken to synthesise these findings. Results: In total, 37 studies with varied designs were included in this review; 3 randomised control trials, 4 quantitative comparative studies, 21 quantitative descriptive studies, 8 qualitative studies and 1 mixed methods study. Studies were mainly from westernised countries. The quality of evidence varied across studies. Health care delivery structures had a strong focus on the identification of mental illness, with processes predominantly comprising health assessment screening on arrival to the short-term custodial setting. Outcomes (at the detainee and organisation level) included increased identification of substance misuse issues and improvement of health conditions, alongside inadequate assessment/identification of physical and mental health issues for detainees. Conclusion: Gaps in evidence identified limited international perspectives as most studies originated from the US, a focus on detainee conditions/symptoms and limited long-term research within the area of health care in short-term custodial settings. Literature regarding health care delivery in short-term custodial settings focused predominantly on mental illness identification. Understanding the nature of health care delivery in short-term custodial settings further through research into specific roles such as the custody nurse is required to develop targeted interventions that address the needs of the detainee on a comprehensive level.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom102198
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume81
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleStructures, processes and outcomes of health care for people detained in short-term police custody settings: A scoping review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWardrop, R; Ranse, J; Chaboyer, W; Crilly, J, Structures, processes and outcomes of health care for people detained in short-term police custody settings: A scoping review, Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 2021, 81, pp. 102198
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-06-29T01:18:15Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRanse, Jamie C.
gro.griffith.authorWardrop, Rachel A.
gro.griffith.authorChaboyer, Wendy
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia


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