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dc.contributor.authorLeonhardt, Sara D
dc.contributor.authorKaluza, Benjamin F
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Helen
dc.contributor.authorHeard, Tim A
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-01T06:12:49Z
dc.date.available2021-07-01T06:12:49Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00359-016-1100-5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405580
dc.description.abstractTo date, no study has investigated how landscape structural (visual) alterations affect navigation and thus homing success in stingless bees. We addressed this question in the Australian stingless bee Tetragonula carbonaria by performing marking, release and re-capture experiments in landscapes differing in habitat homogeneity (i.e., the proportion of elongated ground features typically considered prominent visual landmarks). We investigated how landscape affected the proportion of bees and nectar foragers returning to their hives as well as the earliest time bees and foragers returned. Undisturbed landscapes with few landmarks (that are conspicuous to the human eye) and large proportions of vegetation cover (natural forests) were classified visually/structurally homogeneous, and disturbed landscapes with many landmarks and fragmented or no extensive vegetation cover (gardens and plantations) visually/structurally heterogeneous. We found that proportions of successfully returning nectar foragers and earliest times first bees and foragers returned did not differ between landscapes. However, most bees returned in the visually/structurally most (forest) and least (garden) homogeneous landscape, suggesting that they use other than elongated ground features for navigation and that return speed is primarily driven by resource availability in a landscape.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom701en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto708en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Comparative Physiology A Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume202en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBehavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPhysiologyen_US
dc.titleResources or landmarks: which factors drive homing success in Tetragonula carbonaria foraging in natural and disturbed landscapes?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLeonhardt, SD; Kaluza, BF; Wallace, H; Heard, TA, Resources or landmarks: which factors drive homing success in Tetragonula carbonaria foraging in natural and disturbed landscapes?, Journal of Comparative Physiology A Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology, 2016, 202 (9-10), pp. 701-708en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-01
dc.date.updated2021-07-01T06:08:05Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWallace, Helen M.


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