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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Gurmeet
dc.contributor.authorAiyub, Asheefa Shaheen
dc.contributor.authorGreig, Tuma
dc.contributor.authorNaidu, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorSewak, Aarti
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Shavneet
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-07T01:56:52Z
dc.date.available2021-07-07T01:56:52Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1746-8809
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/IJOEM-03-2021-0308
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405759
dc.description.abstractIn early 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic (Khanra et al., 2021; Talwar et al., 2021), triggering panic buying across many parts of the globe. As governments announced lockdowns to curb the spread of the virus (Bennett et al., 2020), many people rushed to supermarkets to purchase essential supplies. Mainstream media, social media and scholarly research reported people stockpiling food items, medication and sanitary products out of fear of scarcity (Debiec, 2020; Norberg and Rucker, 2020). Most supermarket shelves were left empty by residents hoarding goods, a behavior that is typically observed at the outset of natural disasters such as cyclones or cold weather (Kitching, 2016; Rice, 2016). For instance, severe bulk buying of staples was observed among Taiwanese communities during the forecasted arrival of a super typhoon (Nepartak) in 2016 (Tsao et al., 2019). Similarly, China's 2003 SARS outbreak caused people to bulk up on rice vinegar and medical products. Other notable public emergency crises in the past included: H1N1 flu in China, Hurricane Sandy in the United States, the nuclear accident in Japan, and Haiti's earthquake (Wang et al., 2014).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEmerald Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Emerging Markets
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3801
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3506
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.titleExploring panic buying behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic: a developing country perspective
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSingh, G; Aiyub, AS; Greig, T; Naidu, S; Sewak, A; Sharma, S, Exploring panic buying behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic: a developing country perspective, International Journal of Emerging Markets, 2020
dc.date.updated2021-07-01T21:40:13Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSewak, Aarti


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