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dc.contributor.authorScheeren, Anke M
dc.contributor.authorBuil, J Marieke
dc.contributor.authorHowlin, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorBartels, Meike
dc.contributor.authorBegeer, Sander
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T05:15:15Z
dc.date.available2021-07-08T05:15:15Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1362-3613en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/13623613211027673en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405845
dc.description.abstractLAY ABSTRACT: Previous research has shown that relatively few adults with autism have a paid job or live on their own. However, outcomes also vary a lot and may depend on many different factors. In this study, we examined the level of functioning and happiness of 917 adults with autism (425 men and 492 women) aged 18-65 years. Most of them were of average to high intellectual ability. Over 6 years, we measured whether they had a paid job, close friendships and lived on their own (i.e. their objective functioning). We also measured how happy they felt. Objectively, most autistic adults did fairly to very well. Those with better objective outcomes (e.g. those with paid work) also tended to be happier. Most adults improved in objective functioning and happiness over 6 years. Participants with a lower intellectual ability, more autism traits, mental health problems and younger age had poorer objective outcomes. Participants with more autism traits and mental health problems were less happy. Autistic men and women functioned at similar levels and were equally happy. We found important factors that predict a better (or worse) outcome for autistic adults. Overall, compared with some previous research, our findings give a more positive picture of the outcomes for autistic adults with average to high intellectual abilities.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAutismen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Educationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702en_US
dc.subject.keywordsadult outcomesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsadulthooden_US
dc.subject.keywordsautismen_US
dc.subject.keywordsemploymenten_US
dc.subject.keywordsindependent livingen_US
dc.titleObjective and subjective psychosocial outcomes in adults with autism spectrum disorder: A 6-year longitudinal study.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationScheeren, AM; Buil, JM; Howlin, P; Bartels, M; Begeer, S, Objective and subjective psychosocial outcomes in adults with autism spectrum disorder: A 6-year longitudinal study., Autism, 2021en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-07-08T01:46:51Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHowlin, Patricia


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