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dc.contributor.authorNicol, Jennifer L
dc.contributor.authorHill, Michelle M
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Nicola W
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, Tina L
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-02T01:08:23Z
dc.date.available2021-08-02T01:08:23Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1932-2259en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11764-021-01062-2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405846
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore the attitudes and practices of clinical haematologists towards promoting physical activity (PA) and exercise for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Methods: Using a quantitative cross-sectional survey, clinical haematologists reported on the perceived benefits and acceptability of PA and exercise and frequency, confidence and barriers to providing exercise advice. Results: Clinical haematologists (n=34; 68% response rate), who cumulatively treated ~340 patients with MM each week, completed the survey. Almost all (97%) agreed that PA was important, with benefits for quality of life, activities of daily living, mental health and fatigue. Whilst 88% discussed PA at least occasionally with their patients, approximately two-thirds were not confident advising specific exercises (68%) or identifying PA resources (62%). Despite this, 44% never referred patients to exercise professionals, with 18% only doing so if the patient asked. Over half did not recommend exercise when patients had spine fractures or were physically unwell. No differences were observed in individual factors (age, gender, practice type and own PA participation) and promotion of PA. Conclusions: Clinical haematologists perceive PA as important, but lack confidence on what exercise/s to recommend and if exercise is appropriate for specific disease complications. They tend to not refer patients to exercise professionals. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Patients with MM often suffer from symptoms and toxicities that may be alleviated through PA. However, PA participation rates are low. Support for clinical haematologists for when and how to discuss exercise, and clearer referral pathways to exercise professionals may improve PA uptake and hence ensure access to optimal care, thereby improving patient outcomes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Cancer Survivorshipen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesisen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences, Biomedicalen_US
dc.titlePromoting exercise for patients with multiple myeloma: attitudes and practices of clinical haematologistsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationNicol, JL; Hill, MM; Burton, NW; Skinner, TL, Promoting exercise for patients with multiple myeloma: attitudes and practices of clinical haematologists, Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2021en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-21
dc.date.updated2021-07-08T04:08:56Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Springer US. This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2021. Journal of Cancer Survivorship is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurton, Nicola W.


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