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dc.contributor.authorChigwedere, Ottilia Cassandra
dc.contributor.authorSadath, Anvar
dc.contributor.authorKabir, Zubair
dc.contributor.authorArensman, Ella
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-09T02:03:57Z
dc.date.available2021-07-09T02:03:57Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18136695
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405867
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is increasing evidence that healthcare workers (HCWs) experience significant psychological distress during an epidemic or pandemic. Considering the increase in emerging infectious diseases and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is timely to review and synthesize the available evidence on the psychological impact of disease outbreaks on HCWs. Thus, we conducted a systematic review to examine the impact of epidemics and pandemics on the mental health of HCWs. Method: PubMed, PsycInfo, and PsycArticles databases were systematically searched from inception to June-end 2020 for studies reporting the impact of a pandemic/epidemic on the mental health of HCWs. Results: Seventy-six studies were included in this review. Of these, 34 (45%) focused on SARS, 28 (37%) on COVID-19, seven (9%) on MERS, four (5%) on Ebola, two (3%) on H1N1, and one (1%) on H7N9. Most studies were cross-sectional (93%) and were conducted in a hospital setting (95%). Common mental health symptoms identified by this review were acute stress disorder, depression, anxiety, insomnia, burnout, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The associated risk factors were working in high-risk environments (frontline), being female, being a nurse, lack of adequate personal protective equipment, longer shifts, lack of knowledge of the virus, inadequate training, less years of experience in healthcare, lack of social support, and a history of quarantine. Conclusion: HCWs working in the frontline during epidemics and pandemics experience a wide range of mental health symptoms. It is imperative that adequate psychological support be provided to HCWs during and after these extraordinary distressful events.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom6695
dc.relation.ispartofissue13
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleThe Impact of Epidemics and Pandemics on the Mental Health of Healthcare Workers: A Systematic Review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationChigwedere, OC; Sadath, A; Kabir, Z; Arensman, E, The Impact of Epidemics and Pandemics on the Mental Health of Healthcare Workers: A Systematic Review, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (13), pp. 6695
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-07-09T01:41:54Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorArensman, Ella


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