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dc.contributor.authorMala, Onanong
dc.contributor.authorForster, Elizabeth M
dc.contributor.authorKain, Victoria J
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-16T01:18:13Z
dc.date.available2021-07-16T01:18:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1536-0903
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/ANC.0000000000000911
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/406040
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Neonates in need of intensive care are often subjected to numerous painful procedures. Despite the growing scientific research, hospitalized neonates continue to experience unrelieved pain. Enhancing the competence of neonatal intensive care nurses is an integral component of effective pain management. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to identify and synthesize the existing evidence on nurses' and midwives' competence regarding neonatal pain management internationally. METHODS/SEARCH STRATEGY: The review was guided by Whittemore and Knafl's 5-stage framework, with 8 databases searched in June 2020 including PubMed, CINAHL Complete (via EBSCOhost), MEDLINE (via EBSCOhost), PsycINFO (via Ovid), EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. Reference lists of selected articles were also hand-searched. Studies were reviewed independently for methodology and inclusion and exclusion criteria. The initial search yielded 3037 articles; 19 met the inclusion criteria and were included for analysis: qualitative (n = 5) and quantitative (n = 14). FINDINGS/RESULTS: Nurses' and midwives' competence regarding neonatal pain management in the neonatal intensive care unit is discussed in relation to knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions of competence by most studies. The barriers to effective neonatal pain management were found to relate to nurses' and midwives' factors, underutilized pain assessment tools, and organizational factors. Potential facilitators to effective neonatal pain management included clear evidence-based guidelines/protocols, adequate training, and the use of appropriate and accurate pain assessment tools. Parent involvement and a team approach to neonatal pain management were also identified. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: These findings suggest that further research is necessary to address the barriers and promote facilitators to improve neonatal pain management.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Health
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAdvances in Neonatal Care
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.subject.keywordsClinical Practices, Intensive Care
dc.subject.keywordsNeonatal Nursing, Pain Management
dc.titleNeonatal Nurse and Midwife Competence Regarding Pain Management in Neonates: A Systematic Review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMala, O; Forster, EM; Kain, VJ, Neonatal Nurse and Midwife Competence Regarding Pain Management in Neonates: A Systematic Review, Adv Neonatal Care, 2021, Advances in Neonatal Care
dc.date.updated2021-07-15T21:14:36Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Advances in Neonatal Care. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorForster, Elizabeth M.
gro.griffith.authorMala, Onanong
gro.griffith.authorKain, Victoria J.


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