Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorvan Doore, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorNhep, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-10T04:00:24Z
dc.date.available2021-08-10T04:00:24Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2053-8626
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/406732
dc.description.abstractRecent estimates suggest that there are over 40 million victims of modern slavery in the world today. Modern Slavery is an umbrella term encompassing the offences of human trafficking, slavery, debt bondage, forced labour and other slavery-like practices. Due to the scale and the heinous nature of these crimes, a number of countries are strengthening measures to combat modern slavery, including through the introduction of Modern Slavery legislation. Following the lead of the United Kingdom, a parliamentary Inquiry into whether Australia should establish a Modern Slavery Act was held in 2017. One of the foci of the Inquiry was the issue of how Australia contributes to modern slavery through ‘orphanage trafficking’. Australia is a key donor and volunteer sending country with respect to overseas orphanages, or residential care institutions. The Parliamentary Inquiry heard extensive evidence from non-government organisations and academics pertaining to Australia’s potential involvement in orphanage trafficking through the charity, tourism, education and faith-based sectors. Australia is the first government to consider legislating for orphanage trafficking as a form of modern slavery. Orphanage trafficking is where children are actively recruited into orphanages for the purpose of exploitation and profit. It has strong links to voluntourism (where people visit or volunteer in orphanages) and foreign aid funding emanating from donor countries such as Australia. Of the 8 million children living in orphanages globally, it is estimated that 80% have one or both parents alive that they could be raised by if supported appropriately (Csáky, 2009). Evidence suggests that where there is a demand for volunteering in orphanages, children are recruited from their families to fill those orphanages and pose as ‘paper orphans’ (van Doore, 2016).
dc.publisherE-International Relations
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.e-ir.info/2018/07/13/orphanage-trafficking-and-the-modern-slavery-act-in-australia/
dc.relation.ispartofjournalE-International Relations
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational and comparative law
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4803
dc.titleOrphanage Trafficking and the Modern Slavery Act in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC2 - Articles (Other)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationvan Doore, K; Nhep, R, Orphanage Trafficking and the Modern Slavery Act in Australia, E-International Relations, 2018
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-08-06T03:38:47Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2018. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorvan Doore, Kate E.
gro.griffith.authorNhep, Rebecca


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record