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dc.contributor.authorEwais, T
dc.contributor.authorBegun, J
dc.contributor.authorKenny, M
dc.contributor.authorHay, K
dc.contributor.authorHouldin, E
dc.contributor.authorChuang, KH
dc.contributor.authorTefay, M
dc.contributor.authorKisely, S
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-30T00:49:21Z
dc.date.available2021-08-30T00:49:21Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0022-3999
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/407367
dc.description.abstractBackground: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a promising adjunctive treatment for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and comorbid depression. Objectives: This pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of an adapted MBCT program for AYA, aged 16–29, with IBD. Methods: Sixty-four AYAs were randomly allocated to MBCT (n = 33) or treatment as usual (TAU) (n = 31). Primary outcome measure was the depression score on Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. Secondary outcomes included anxiety, stress, IBD-related quality of life, coping, mindfulness, post-traumatic growth, medication adherence, IBD activity, inflammatory markers, microbiome characteristics and brain functional connectivity. Results: Study recruitment rate was 75%, retention rate 70%, and session attendance 92%. Intention to treat analyses revealed that, compared to TAU group, MBCT group had significantly lower depression (∆ = −6.0; 95%CI = -10.8 to −1.2; P = 0.015) and stress (∆ = −5.1; 95%CI = -10.1 to −0.0; P = 0.049), higher active coping (∆ = 1.0;95%CI = 0.1–1.9; P = 0.022), and total mindfulness scores (∆ = 10.9;95%CI = 1.1–20.8; P = 0.030) at 8 weeks (post-therapy), and improved coping by positive reframing (∆ = 1.1;95%CI = 0.0–2.2; P = 0.043) and planning (∆ = 0.9;95%CI = 0.0–1.9; P = 0.045), mindful awareness (∆ = 5.2.;95%CI = 2.0–8.5; P = 0.002) and total mindfulness scores (∆ = 10.8.;95%CI = 0.4–21.1; P = 0.042) at 20 weeks. On per protocol analysis, MBCT group had significantly lower depression (∆ = −6.3; 95%CI = -11.4 to −1.2; P = 0.015), stress (∆ = −6.0; 95%CI = -11.2 to −0.5; P = 0.032), increased active coping (∆ = 0.9;95%CI = 0–1.7; P = 0.05) at 8 weeks, and mindful awareness (∆ = 5.4; 95%CI = 2.1–8.6; P = 0.001) at 20 weeks. Conclusion: In AYAs with IBD, MBCT is feasible and beneficial in improving depression, stress, mindfulness and adaptive coping. It holds promise as an important component of integrated IBD care. Trial registration number ACTRN12617000876392, U1111-1197-7370; Pre-results.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom110594
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume149
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode42
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.titleMindfulness based cognitive therapy for youth with inflammatory bowel disease and depression - Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationEwais, T; Begun, J; Kenny, M; Hay, K; Houldin, E; Chuang, KH; Tefay, M; Kisely, S, Mindfulness based cognitive therapy for youth with inflammatory bowel disease and depression - Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial, Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2021, 149, pp. 110594
dc.date.updated2021-08-29T23:39:45Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKisely, Steve R.
gro.griffith.authorEwais, Tatjana


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