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dc.contributor.authorJorgensen, Robynen_US
dc.contributor.editorClaire Wyatt-Smith, John Elkins & Stephanie Gunnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:15:12Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:15:12Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-09T07:05:57Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781402088636en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4020-8864-3_15en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40736
dc.description.abstractIndigenous students in Australia perform poorly on testing measures (MCEETYA, 2009). This is of national concern and a priority for government, as evidenced in the 'Closing the Gap' initiative (FaHCSIA, 2009). Geographical location and poverty compound issues of indigeneity, so that Indigenous students in remote locations are most at risk of performing poorly on measures of literacy and numeracy. In this chapter, I seek to challenge the orthodoxy that poor performances among remote/Indigenous students are a consequence of construct sof ability or learning dif?culties per se. Rather, I seek to illustrate how the mathematics curriculum delivered to Indigenous students represents a particular cultural form.This is particularly poignant as Australia moves to a national curriculum (National Curriculum Board, 2008). The dif?culties in learning mathematics experienced by many Indigenous students can be thought of as a confrontation of language differences (and, by implication, culture). From this perspective, coming to learn mathematics is about 'cracking the code' through which mathematical concepts and processes are embedded and relayed, so that learning dif?culties are viewed as structural dif?culties rather than individual dif?culties. By reconceptualising the 'learning dif?culties' experienced by Indigenous learners in mathematics/numeracy, a more inclusive approach to educational reform can be envisaged and enacted.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent108189 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleMultiple Perspectives on Difficulties in Learning Literacy and Numeracyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom315en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto329en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130208en_US
dc.titleLanguage, culture and learning mathematics: A Bourdieuian analysis of Indigenous learningen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Springer. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. It is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Please refer to the publisher's website for further information.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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