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dc.contributor.authorSuetani, Shuichi
dc.contributor.authorSaha, Sukanta
dc.contributor.authorEyles, Darryl W
dc.contributor.authorScott, James G
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, John J
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-30T23:13:17Z
dc.date.available2021-08-30T23:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0004867416681853
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/407389
dc.description.abstractObjective: Having sufficient sera concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is important for a range of health outcomes including cardiometabolic diseases. Clinical studies in people with psychotic disorders suggest that a sizable proportion has suboptimal vitamin D status (i.e. vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency). Individuals with psychosis also have many of the risk factors associated with suboptimal vitamin D status such as smoking, obesity, and reduced physical activity. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of vitamin D status using a large, population-based sample of adults with psychotic disorders. Methods: Data were collected as part of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis, a population-based survey of Australians aged 18-64 years with a psychotic disorder. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was measured in 463 participants. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was dichotomised into optimal (above 50 nmol/L) and suboptimal (below 50 nmol/L). The influence of a range of socio-demographic and clinical variables on vitamin D status was examined using logistic regression. Results: Nearly half (43.6%) of the participants had suboptimal vitamin D status. Those with (a) increased physical activity or (b) positive symptoms had significantly reduced odds of having suboptimal vitamin D status. However, there were no significant associations between suboptimal vitamin D status and other psychiatric symptom measures or cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusion: Many people with psychotic disorders have suboptimal vitamin D status. As part of the routine assessment of physical health status, clinicians should remain mindful of vitamin D status in this vulnerable population and encourage the use of appropriate vitamin D supplements.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom921
dc.relation.ispartofpageto929
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume51
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPsychiatry
dc.subject.keywordsPsychotic disorders
dc.subject.keywordsphysical activity
dc.titlePrevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: Data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSuetani, S; Saha, S; Eyles, DW; Scott, JG; McGrath, JJ, Prevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: Data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis, Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2017, 51 (9), pp. 921-929
dc.date.updated2021-08-30T23:10:01Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSuetani, Shuichi


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