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dc.contributor.authorRodwell, David
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Marina
dc.contributor.authorBates, Lyndel
dc.contributor.authorLarue, Gregoire S
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Barry
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-15T00:42:37Z
dc.date.available2021-09-15T00:42:37Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1369-8478en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trf.2021.01.009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/407842
dc.description.abstractIn many jurisdictions with Graduated Driver Licensing systems, such as those in North America, Australia, and New Zealand, parents play an important role in teaching their child how to drive and facilitating their access to formal driver education. This study explored parents’ views on these processes in a theoretically grounded manner using the Goals for Driver Education (GDE) Framework. The GDE framework groups influences on young driver behaviour into four interconnected hierarchical levels: vehicle manoeuvring (Level 1), mastery of traffic situations (Level 2), goals and contexts for driving (Level 3) and goals for life and skills for living (Level 4). Fourteen parents of novice drivers participated in five focus groups held in urban and regional locations in South East Queensland, Australia. A six-step thematic analysis was used consisting of (1) familiarisation with the data, (2) generation of initial codes, (3) searching for themes, (4) reviewing themes, (5) defining and naming themes and (6) producing the report. Parents indicated that they were more likely to outsource the teaching of skills at Levels 1 and 2 of the GDE to professional driving instructors as they were concerned that they would pass bad habits onto their child or they were unaware of the road rules that their child was required to follow. Parents believed that they were able to more effectively teach skills located on Levels 3 and 4 of the GDE framework because they had a greater knowledge of their child when compared with professional educators. The study findings can be used to develop an intervention that would support parents to more effectively supervise learner drivers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom293en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto311en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviouren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume77en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/LP140100409
dc.relation.grantIDLP140100409en_US
dc.relation.fundersARCen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransportation and Freight Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1507en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Applieden_US
dc.subject.keywordsTransportationen_US
dc.titleParents' perceptions of driver education: A theoretically guided qualitative investigationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRodwell, D; Alexander, M; Bates, L; Larue, GS; Watson, B, Parents' perceptions of driver education: A theoretically guided qualitative investigation, Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 2021, 77, pp. 293-311en_US
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-09-09T01:22:21Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBates, Lyndel J.


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