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dc.contributor.authorRimmer, Susan Harris
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Elise
dc.contributor.authorVerhelst, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-14T03:08:00Z
dc.date.available2021-09-14T03:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1945-4724en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/sais.2021.0005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/407931
dc.description.abstractScholars such as Carol Johnson and Blair Williams have argued that COVID-19 has led to more favorable coverage of female political leaders than was previously the case. This is attributed to a traditional perception of the motherly role associated with the political response. They laud New Zealand as an exemplary feminist political response in this crisis. Yet Queensland, an Australian state, is also headed by a female politician, with an equivalent population of just over five million, just over 1,300 COVID-19 cases, and only seven deaths. Like Jacinda Ardern, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk won an election in October 2020, in what was perceived as a referendum on her government’s approach to COVID-19 response and recovery. Instead of invoking maternal images, she instead exercised what we term “feminist stewardship” by transferring her legal power over to apolitical medical experts. She was seen to display feminine protectionism by closing internal borders and resisting pressure to re-open borders from male elites who labelled her “heartless.” Even so, her party’s economic recovery package remained resolutely focused on traditional male-dominated areas of mining and construction. This paper extends our understanding of gender and political leadership during COVID-19 by drawing on extensive gender-disaggregated health, economic, and electoral data.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom49en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto59en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSAIS Review of International Affairsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41en_US
dc.titleNew Dimensions of Gender and Political Leadership During COVID-19: Linking Feminist Stewardship and Electoral Success in Queensland, Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRimmer, SH; Stephenson, E; Verhelst, T, New Dimensions of Gender and Political Leadership During COVID-19: Linking Feminist Stewardship and Electoral Success in Queensland, Australia, SAIS Review of International Affairs, 2021, 41 (1), pp. 49-59en_US
dc.date.updated2021-09-14T02:34:20Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHarris Rimmer, Susan G.


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