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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jaimon T
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Suetonia C
dc.contributor.authorWai, Shu Ning
dc.contributor.authorRuospo, Marinella
dc.contributor.authorCarrero, Juan-Jesus
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Katrina L
dc.contributor.authorStrippoli, Giovanni FM
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-15T01:19:22Z
dc.date.available2021-09-15T01:19:22Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1555-9041
dc.identifier.doi10.2215/CJN.06190616
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/407972
dc.description.abstractBackground and objectives: Patients with CKD are advised to follow dietary recommendations that restrict individual nutrients. Emerging evidence indicates overall eating patterns may better predict clinical outcomes, however, current data on dietary patterns in kidney disease are limited. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and mortality or ESRD among adults with CKD. Medline, Embase, and reference lists were systematically searched up to November 24, 2015 by two independent review authors. Eligible studies were longitudinal cohort studies reporting the association of dietary patterns with mortality, cardiovascular events, or ESRD. Results: A total of seven studies involving 15, 285 participants were included. Healthy dietary patterns were generally higher in fruit and vegetables, fish, legumes, cereals, whole grains, and fiber, and lower in red meat, salt, and refined sugars. In six studies, healthy dietary patterns were consistently associated with lower mortality (3983 events; adjusted relative risk, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.83; risk difference of 46 fewer (29-63 fewer) events per 1000 people over 5 years). There was no statistically significant association between healthy dietary patterns and risk of ESRD (1027 events; adjusted relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 1.40). Conclusions: Healthy dietary patterns are associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. Interventions to support adherence to increased fruit and vegetable, fish, legume, whole grain, and fiber intake, and reduced red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake could be effective tools to lower mortality in people with kidney disease.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Nephrology
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom272
dc.relation.ispartofpageto279
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsUrology & Nephrology
dc.subject.keywordsCHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE
dc.subject.keywordsALL-CAUSE MORTALITY
dc.titleHealthy dietary patterns and risk of mortality and ESRD in CKD: A meta-analysis of cohort studies
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKelly, JT; Palmer, SC; Wai, SN; Ruospo, M; Carrero, J-J; Campbell, KL; Strippoli, GFM, Healthy dietary patterns and risk of mortality and ESRD in CKD: A meta-analysis of cohort studies, Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2017, 12 (2), pp. 272-279
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-19
dc.date.updated2021-09-15T01:15:56Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCampbell, Katrina
gro.griffith.authorKelly, Jaimon


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