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dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Vicki
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, Juanita
dc.contributor.authorUsher, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-16T04:25:13Z
dc.date.available2021-09-16T04:25:13Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn2160-3715
dc.identifier.doi10.46743/2160-3715/2015.2333
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408066
dc.description.abstractThe origins of this paper lie in our experiences of having heard too many stories with the same outcome or ending in the field of inquiry and practice described as “Aboriginal Mental Health.” This paper was written in an attempt to make sense of these experiences. It does so by focussing on another type of outcome or story ending in mental health care/research contexts more widely known as [Recovery]. Not to be confused with the term recovery as it is used in addiction studies, the concept of [Recovery] currently underpinning mental health care policies and reform is at once a philosophy, a practice orientation, and a guiding value and principle. This paper emerged from a range of discussions about [Recovery] as a practice orientation and a particular type of story-ending told by those who receive and provide Aboriginal mental health care in North Queensland. Poetic inquiry was used as a way to respond to the questions that arose from these discussions. In the research projects and discussions that foreground and underpin this paper, the use of poetic reasoning and writing, evolved from using poetry as a reflective tool, to a being used as a method of data collection, data construction, analysis and interpretation (even though none of these words appropriately inscribe these aspects of research within Arts informed research practices). It is also posited as an aesthetic and ethical way of (re)presenting the results of inquiring. This paper (re)presents and unpacks a particular generated poem to demonstrate the approach (as it is and was) used. As an arts-informed approach to social inquiry and to writing, the purpose of this text is to open or introduce an awkward pause in an ongoing dialogue or conversation about Aboriginal people in mental health care and to amplify the Aboriginal voices informing the development of this text.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNova Southeastern University
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1594
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1608
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Qualitative Report
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences, Interdisciplinary
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences - Other Topics
dc.subject.keywordsAboriginal Mental Health
dc.subject.keywordsRecovery
dc.titleIf You Knew the End of the Story, Would you Still Want to Hear It?: The Importance of Narrative Time for Mental Health Care
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSaunders, V; Sherwood, J; Usher, K, If You Knew the End of the Story, Would you Still Want to Hear It?: The Importance of Narrative Time for Mental Health Care, The Qualitative Report, 2015, 20 (10), pp. 1594-1608
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-09-16T04:14:57Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under a licence identical to this one.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSaunders, Vicki
gro.griffith.authorSherwood, Juanita


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