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dc.contributor.advisorYounger, Janette A
dc.contributor.authorDonaldson, Charles A
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-20T04:43:48Z
dc.date.available2021-09-20T04:43:48Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-01
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/4333
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408101
dc.description.abstractThis exegesis reports on research undertaken for the fulfilment of my Master of Visual Arts candidature at Griffith University. My research project takes the form of a practice led installation-based studio methodology. Through the fabrication of objects in the context of a visual arts practice that parodies archival systems, it aims to effect change in our contemporary understanding of “objective” truth by exploring the impact of truthiness (emotionally motivated belief, confirmed by gut feeling instead of facts) and embracing conspiracy culture. I argue that truthiness is widespread online as a sociopolitical tool and phenomenon. I contend the rise of mass information overload and image circulation online has propagated truthiness into every aspect of an increasingly online visual culture. I examine the rise of conspiracy as a mainstream visual language and discuss why and how individuals come to accept alternative accounts of history and explanations of the present. I assess the role of archival preservation in contemporary information dissemination, examining the influence of online systems upon how we store and access socio-political materials. I contend that archives can no longer be considered objective sites that merely and apolitically store/catalogue information. Rather, archives are subjective sites of interpretation and construction, produced and managed by many from diverse backgrounds—including artists. I discuss the methodology of genealogical research, suggesting that a multifaceted approach to historiography generates a new “effective” history, informed by multiple perspectives that aim to change interpretations of history and historiography. I identify a contextual correlation between the work of three practitioners— namely, Trevor Paglen’s conspiratorially bent research, Walid Raad’s fabricated archive and Christian Boltanski’s archival parodies. This correlation points to a congruity of research into the impact of truthiness, archival subjectivity, and mainstream conspiracy culture in contemporary art. Finally, I discuss two research outcomes and conclude whether the aims of the research project have been achieved.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsinstallation-baseden_US
dc.subject.keywordsstudio methodologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsobjective truthen_US
dc.subject.keywordstruthinessen_US
dc.subject.keywordsconspiracy cultureen_US
dc.subject.keywordsvisual arts practiceen_US
dc.titleGot a Gut Feeling: Truthiness, conspiracy and archives in contemporary cultureen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education and Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorSmith, Martin J
gro.identifier.gurtID000000028002en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Masters)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramMaster of Visual Arts (MVA)en_US
gro.departmentQueensland College of Arten_US
gro.griffith.authorDonaldson, Charles A


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