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dc.contributor.authorLaver, RJ
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, SV
dc.contributor.authorRosauer, DF
dc.contributor.authorOliver, PM
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T06:11:10Z
dc.date.available2021-09-23T06:11:10Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1055-7903
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ympev.2017.07.015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408287
dc.description.abstractComparisons of biodiversity patterns within lineages that occur across major climate gradients and biomes, can provide insights into the relative roles that lineage history, landscape and climatic variation, and environmental change have played in shaping regional biotas. In Australia, while there has been extensive research into the origins and patterns of diversity in the Australian Arid Zone (AAZ), how diversity is distributed across this biome and the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) to the north, has been less studied. We compared the timing and patterns of diversification across this broad aridity gradient in a clade of lizards (Strophurus: phasmid geckos) that only occur in association with a unique Australian radiation of sclerophyllous grasses (Triodia: spinifex). Our results indicate that overall genetic diversity is much higher, older and more finely geographically structured within the AMT, including distantly related clades endemic to the sandstone escarpments of the Kimberley and Arnhem Plateau. Niche modelling analyses also suggest that the distribution of taxa in the AMT is more strongly correlated with variation in topographic relief than in the AAZ. The two broad patterns that we recovered – (i) lineage endemism increases as latitude decreases, and (ii) endemism is tightly correlated to rocky regions – parallel and corroborate other recent studies of habitat generalists and specialised saxicoline lineages occurring across these same regions. Early Miocene diversification estimates also suggest that, soon after Triodia grasses colonised Australia and began to diversify in the Miocene, phasmid geckos with Gondwanan ancestry shifted into these grasses, and have subsequently remained closely associated with this unique vegetation type.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom62
dc.relation.ispartofpageto70
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMolecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
dc.relation.ispartofvolume115
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGenetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3104
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3105
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3109
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian arid zone
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian monsoonal tropics
dc.subject.keywordsCryptic diversity
dc.subject.keywordsNorthern deserts
dc.subject.keywordsSpinifex
dc.titleTrans-biome diversity in Australian grass-specialist lizards (Diplodactylidae: Strophurus)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLaver, RJ; Nielsen, SV; Rosauer, DF; Oliver, PM, Trans-biome diversity in Australian grass-specialist lizards (Diplodactylidae: Strophurus), Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 2017, 115, pp. 62-70
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-07-13
dc.date.updated2021-09-23T06:09:38Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorOliver, Paul M.


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