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dc.contributor.authorPietsch, J
dc.contributor.authorMiller, M
dc.contributor.authorKarp, JA
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T06:24:36Z
dc.date.available2021-09-23T06:24:36Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1745-7289en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17457289.2014.925904en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408296
dc.description.abstractDespite the enthusiasm surrounding the Colour Revolutions and the Arab Spring, the world's share of democracies has stagnated over the past 15 years. The steady rise of China, Russia, and Iran has also led to warnings of a resurgence of “authoritarian great powers”, especially in light of the financial crisis centred in the USA and Western Europe (Gat, 2007; Plattner, 2011). On the positive side, however, democracy remains remarkably popular as an ideal. In the Global barometer's most recent survey, two out of three respondents say democracy is their most favoured political system, including a majority in 49 of the 55 countries. Yet there is evidence, much expanded upon in this issue, that commitments to liberal democracy in practice are not as strong (Carlson & Turner, 2009; Krastev, 2007; Shin & Wells, 2005). Nominally pro-democratic citizens frequently favour limitations on electoral accountability and individual rights in the service of improved governance or economic growth. Further, there are rising concerns that many citizens, especially across the developing world, are turning away from democracy out of frustration with democratic performance (Chang et al., 2007; Kurlantzick, 2013).en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Elections, Public Opinion and Partiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4408en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410en_US
dc.titlePublic Support for Democracy in Transitional Regimesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPietsch, J; Miller, M; Karp, JA, Public Support for Democracy in Transitional Regimes, Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties, 2015, 25 (1), pp. 1-9en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-09-23T05:25:11Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPietsch, Juliet


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