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dc.contributor.authorKalema, Rudy N
dc.contributor.authorDuhig, Steven J
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Morgan D
dc.contributor.authorDonaldson, Alex
dc.contributor.authorShield, Anthony J
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-27T02:05:24Z
dc.date.available2021-09-27T02:05:24Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2021.09.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408380
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of this study was to explore expert opinion to identify the components of sprinting technique they believed to be risk factors for hamstring strain injuries (HSI). Design: Mixed-method research design. Methods: The Concept Systems groupwisdomTM web platform was used to analyse and collect data. Participants brainstormed, sorted and rated the components of sprinting technique to consider in a HSI prevention strategy. Results: Twenty-three experts (academic/researcher, physiotherapist, strength and conditioning coaches and sprint coaches) brainstormed 66 statements that were synthesised and edited to 60 statements. Nineteen participants sorted the statements into clusters and rated them for relative importance and confidence they could be addressed in a hamstring injury prevention program. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis identified a 8-cluster solution modified to a 5-cluster solution by the research team: Training prescription (10 statements, mean importance: 3.79 out of 5 and mean confidence: 3.79); Neuromuscular and tendon properties (9, 3.09, 3.08); Kinematics parameters/Technical skills (27, 2.99, 2.98); Kinetics parameters (10, 2.85, 2.92); and Hip mechanics (4, 2.70, 2.63). The statement: “low exposure to maximal sprint running” located in the cluster “Training prescription” received the highest mean importance (4.55) and confidence ratings (4.42) of all statements. Conclusion: The five clusters of components of sprinting technique believed to be risk factors for HSIs in order of most to least important were: training prescription, neuromuscular and tendon properties, kinematics parameters/technical drills, kinetics parameters and hip mechanics.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman biophysics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320802
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3208
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.titleSprinting Technique and Hamstring Strain Injuries: A Concept Mapping Study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKalema, RN; Duhig, SJ; Williams, MD; Donaldson, A; Shield, AJ, Sprinting Technique and Hamstring Strain Injuries: A Concept Mapping Study, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2021
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-09-27T01:51:08Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDuhig, Steven


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