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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Ashleigh Cara
dc.contributor.authorCossar, Reece
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Shelley
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Anna Lee
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Brendan
dc.contributor.authorDietze, Paul
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorKirwan, Amy
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Michael
dc.contributor.authorOgloff, James RP
dc.contributor.authorKinner, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Campbell
dc.contributor.authorButler, Tony
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Emma
dc.contributor.authorStoove, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-30T04:55:34Z
dc.date.available2021-09-30T04:55:34Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1471-2288
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12874-021-01380-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408486
dc.description.abstractBackground: There are significant challenges associated with studies of people released from custodial settings, including loss to follow-up in the community. Interpretation of findings with consideration of differences between those followed up and those not followed up is critical in the development of evidence-informed policies and practices. We describe attrition bias in the Prison and Transition Health (PATH) prospective cohort study, and strategies employed to minimise attrition. Methods: PATH involves 400 men with a history of injecting drug use recruited from three prisons in Victoria, Australia. Four interviews were conducted: one pre-release (‘baseline’) and three interviews at approximately 3, 12, and 24 months post-release (‘follow-up’). We assessed differences in baseline characteristics between those retained and not retained in the study, reporting mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: Most participants (85%) completed at least one follow-up interview and 162 (42%) completed all three follow-up interviews. Retained participants were younger than those lost to follow-up (mean diff − 3.1 years, 95% CI -5.3, − 0.9). There were no other statistically significant differences observed in baseline characteristics. Conclusion: The high proportion of participants retained in the PATH cohort study via comprehensive follow-up procedures, coupled with extensive record linkage to a range of administrative datasets, is a considerable strength of the study. Our findings highlight how strategic and comprehensive follow-up procedures, frequent contact with participants and secondary contacts, and established working relationships with the relevant government departments can improve study retention and potentially minimise attrition bias.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom185
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Medical Research Methodology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Care Sciences & Services
dc.subject.keywordsAttrition bias
dc.subject.keywordsPeople in prison
dc.titleStrategies to maximise study retention and limit attrition bias in a prospective cohort study of men reporting a history of injecting drug use released from prison: the prison and transition health study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStewart, AC; Cossar, R; Walker, S; Wilkinson, AL; Quinn, B; Dietze, P; Winter, R; Kirwan, A; Curtis, M; Ogloff, JRP; Kinner, S; Aitken, C; Butler, T; Woods, E; Stoove, M, Strategies to maximise study retention and limit attrition bias in a prospective cohort study of men reporting a history of injecting drug use released from prison: the prison and transition health study, BMC Medical Research Methodology, 2021, 21 (1), pp. 185
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-31
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-09-30T04:26:29Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2021 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKinner, Stuart A.


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