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dc.contributor.authorCross, Troy J
dc.contributor.authorIsautier, Jennifer MJ
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Sarah J
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Bruce D
dc.contributor.authorWheatley-Guy, Courtney M
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Bryan J
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T23:57:50Z
dc.date.available2021-10-05T23:57:50Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2369-2960en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/31278en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408590
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has arguably facilitated a shift toward increased sedentariness and reduced physical activity. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that mental health has also declined during the pandemic. However, it remains unknown to what extent social distancing (SD) behaviors and mental health have affected the physical activity levels of the general population. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of SD behaviors and prevailing mental health on the odds of being physically active during the early COVID-19 pandemic response. METHODS: A total of 4819 adults (2474/4819, 51.3%, female) from the US population with a median age of 46 (IQR 35-59) completed an online survey during the early pandemic response (April-June 2020). The survey included questions on adherence to 11 SD behaviors, and validated questionnaires which assessed self-reported physical activity, depression, anxiety, and mental well-being. Respondents were categorized into 2 physical activity groups: inactive (0-599 metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-minutes/week) and active (≥600 MET-minutes/week). A logistic generalized additive model (GAM) was used to determine which SD factors and mental health outcomes were associated with physical activity level. RESULTS: The GAM analysis revealed that wearing a facemask in public (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.14-1.79; P=.003), limiting the use of public transport (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19-1.83; P=.001), and restricting travel outside the house (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.19-2.05; P=.002) were SD behaviors associated with higher odds of being more physically active. Conversely, avoiding physical activity outside the house was associated with higher odds of being inactive (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.46-0.63; P<.001). Leaving the house more frequently, and a higher mental well-being were associated with increasing odds of being physically active (P<.001). Engaging with a moderate number of SD behaviors (3-7 total) was positively associated with physical activity, whereas a very high SD vigilance (ie, engaging with ≥10 total behaviors) decreased the odds of being active during the early pandemic response. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings of our study, we suggest that future public health messaging of SD guidelines should include (1) a clear portrayal of the benefits of regular exercise on mental health; and (2) a specific focus on how to be physically active outdoors in a COVID-safe manner.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publications Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome31278en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJMIR Public Health Surveillen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCOVID-19en_US
dc.subject.keywordsexerciseen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmental healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordspandemicen_US
dc.subject.keywordsphysical activityen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Social Distancing Behaviors and Psychosocial Factors on Physical Activity During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Cross-sectional Survey Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCross, TJ; Isautier, JMJ; Morris, SJ; Johnson, BD; Wheatley-Guy, CM; Taylor, BJ, The Influence of Social Distancing Behaviors and Psychosocial Factors on Physical Activity During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Cross-sectional Survey Study., JMIR Public Health Surveill, 2021, 7 (9), pp. e31278en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-16
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-05T23:49:46Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© Troy J Cross, Jennifer M J Isautier, Sarah J Morris, Bruce D Johnson, Courtney M Wheatley-Guy, Bryan J Taylor. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (https://publichealth.jmir.org), 24.09.2021. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://publichealth.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCross, Troy J.


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