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dc.contributor.authorSun, Ching-wen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ya-jing
dc.contributor.authorFang, Yu-qi
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yu-qian
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xuan
dc.contributor.authorSo, Billy CL
dc.contributor.authorShum, David HK
dc.contributor.authorYan, Chao
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-06T00:57:22Z
dc.date.available2021-10-06T00:57:22Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2046-0252en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pchj.485en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408597
dc.description.abstractThe therapeutic effect of antidepressants has been demonstrated for anhedonia in patients with depression. However, antidepressants may cause side-effects, such as cardiovascular dysfunction. Although physical activity has minor side-effects, it may serve as an alternative for improving anhedonia and depression. We sought to investigate whether physical activity reduces the level of anhedonia in individuals with depression. Fifty-six university students with moderate depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory total score > 16) were divided into three training groups: the Running Group (RG, n = 19), the Stretching Group (SG, n = 19), and the Control Group (n = 18). We employed the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task and the Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS) to evaluate hedonic capacity. All participants in the RG and SG received 8 weeks of jogging and stretching training, respectively. The RG experienced an increase in the level of arousal during anticipation of a future reward and recalled less negativity towards the loss condition. The SG exhibited enhanced scores on the Anticipatory and Consummatory Pleasure subscales of the TEPS after training. Moreover, in the RG, greater improvements in anticipatory arousal ratings for pleasure and remembered valence ratings for negative affect were associated with longer training duration, lower maximum heart rate, and higher consumed calories during training. To conclude, physical activity is effective in improving anticipatory anhedonia in individuals with depressive symptoms.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsyCh Journalen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive neuroscienceen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode520203en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Multidisciplinaryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsanhedoniaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsanticipatory pleasureen_US
dc.titleThe effect of physical activity on anhedonia in individuals with depressive symptomsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSun, C-W; Wang, Y-J; Fang, Y-Q; He, Y-Q; Wang, X; So, BCL; Shum, DHK; Yan, C, The effect of physical activity on anhedonia in individuals with depressive symptoms, PsyCh Journal, 2021en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-04
dc.date.updated2021-10-01T00:57:15Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorShum, David


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