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dc.contributor.authorAbajobir, Amanuel Alemu
dc.contributor.authorKisely, Steve
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gail
dc.contributor.authorClavarino, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorStrathearn, Lane
dc.contributor.authorNajman, Jake Moses
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-06T02:43:37Z
dc.date.available2021-10-06T02:43:37Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0376-8716
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.12.027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/408630
dc.description.abstractBackground: Childhood maltreatment has been associated with a range of adverse mental and psychosocial outcomes, but its association with subsequent injecting drug use (IDU) is less clear. This study investigates the associations between specific and multiple forms of substantiated childhood maltreatment and IDU reported at 21 years. Method: The Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy is a prospective birth cohort study. It recruited pregnant women at their first antenatal clinic visit and collected data on their children at 21 years. Data from 3750 participants (1769 males and 1981 females) were analysed using agency substantiated childhood maltreatment from birth to 14 years of age and self-reports of ever IDU at 21 years. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to control for possible confounders. Results: The sample's mean age was 20.6 years. Some 4.1% (n = 72) of males and 4.6% (n = 91) of females had experienced substantiated childhood maltreatment. The prevalence of IDU was 6.6% (n = 118) and 4.6% (n = 91) for males and females, respectively. In adjusted models, all forms of substantiated childhood maltreatment, with the exception of sexual abuse, were associated with IDU in females (adjusted odds ratios (AORs) = 2.69–3.02) but only emotional abuse (AOR = 2.51) was associated with IDU in males. Multiply occurring forms of childhood maltreatment were also associated with IDU in females (AORs = 2.36–3.41) but not in males. Conclusions: Injecting drug use appears to be an adverse outcome of childhood maltreatment particularly in females. Additional research is needed to better understand why females appear to be more affected than males.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom163
dc.relation.ispartofpageto169
dc.relation.ispartofjournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
dc.relation.ispartofvolume173
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsSubstance Abuse
dc.subject.keywordsPsychiatry
dc.subject.keywordsChildhood maltreatment
dc.titleGender-based differences in injecting drug use by young adults who experienced maltreatment in childhood: Findings from an Australian birth cohort study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAbajobir, AA; Kisely, S; Williams, G; Clavarino, A; Strathearn, L; Najman, JM, Gender-based differences in injecting drug use by young adults who experienced maltreatment in childhood: Findings from an Australian birth cohort study, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2017, 173, pp. 163-169
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-30
dc.date.updated2021-10-06T02:41:12Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKisely, Steve R.


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