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dc.contributor.authorSchouten, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorLemckert, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorParisi, Alfioen_US
dc.contributor.authorDowns, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnderhill, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Geoffen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:14:28Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:14:28Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-23T07:05:58Z
dc.identifier.issn09570233en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0957-0233/22/6/065703en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40885
dc.description.abstractOver the past 50 years numerous types of chemical films and monolayers have been deployed on top of a wide variety of water reserves in an endeavour to reduce evaporation. To date very little knowledge has been assimilated on how these chemical films and monolayers, once applied to a water surface, influence the underwater UV light field and, in turn, the delicate ecosystems that exist in aquatic environments. This manuscript presents underwater UV exposure profiles weighted to the DNA damage action spectrum measured under an octadecanol/hexadecanol/lime chemical film mixture, a silicone-based chemical film and an octadecanol monolayer applied to the water surface. UV transmission and absorption properties were also evaluated for each of these chemical films and monolayers. From this it was found that when chemical films/monolayers are applied to surface water they can reduce the penetration of biologically effective UV into the water column by up to 85% at a depth as small as 1 cm. This could have a positive influence on the aquatic ecosystem, as harmful UV radiation may be prevented from reaching and consequently damaging a variety of life forms or it could have a negative effect by potentially stopping aquatic organisms from adapting to solar ultraviolet radiation over extended application intervals. Additionally, there is currently no readily applicable system or technique available to readily detect or visualize chemical films and monolayers on the water surface. To overcome this problem a new method of monolayer and chemical film visualization, using a UV camera system, is detailed and tested and its applicability for usage in both laboratory-based trials and real-world operations is evaluated.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent752326 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMeasurement Science and Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050206en_US
dc.titleChemical films and monolayers on the water surface and their interactions with ultraviolet radiation: a pilot investigationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Institute of Physics Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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