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dc.contributor.authorJ. Umbers, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoeuf, Philippeen_US
dc.contributor.authorClapham, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorI. Stanisic, Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaiwog, Francescaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Ivoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiba, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorL. King, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorG. Beeson, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlazier, Jocelynen_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Rogerson, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:39:01Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:39:01Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-04-29T22:10:35Z
dc.identifier.issn00221899en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiq080en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40889
dc.description.abstractBackground. The pathogenetic mechanisms of fetal growth restriction associated with placental malaria are largely unknown. We sought to determine whether placental malaria and related inflammation were associated with disturbances in the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, a major regulator of fetal growth. Method. We measured IGF-1 and IGF-2 concentrations in plasma from 88 mother-neonate pairs at delivery and IGF binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, respectively) in cord plasma from a cohort of Papua New Guinean women with and without placental malaria. Messenger RNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-2, and the IGF receptors were measured in matched placental biopsy specimens. Results. Compared with those for uninfected pregnancies, IGF-1 levels were reduced by 28% in plasma samples from women with placental Plasmodium falciparum infection and associated inflammation (P = .007) and by 25% in their neonates (P = .002). Levels of fetal IGFBP-1 were elevated in placental malaria with and without inflammation (P = .08 and P = .006, respectively) compared with uninfected controls. IGF-2 and IGFBP-3 plasma concentrations and placental IGF ligand and receptor messenger RNA transcript levels were similar across groups. Conclusion. Placental malaria-associated inflammation disturbs maternal and fetal levels of IGFs, which regulate fetal growth. This may be one mechanism by which placental malaria leads to fetal growth restriction.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent184005 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom561en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto569en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume203en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchImmunology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110799en_US
dc.titlePlacental Malaria-Associated Inflammation Disturbs the Insulin-like Growth Factor Axis of Fetal Growth Regulationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 by University of Chicago Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in The Journal of Geology. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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