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dc.contributor.authorFenton, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorN. Johnson, Karyn
dc.contributor.authorBrownlie, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorD. D. Hurst, Gregory
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:30:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:30:53Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2011-09-22T06:48:58Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/661247
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40897
dc.description.abstractWolbachia is one of the most common symbionts of arthropods. Its establishment requires lateral transfer to and successful transmission within novel host species. However, Wolbachia performs poorly when introduced into new host species, and models predict that Wolbachia should seldom be able to establish from low initial frequencies. Recently, various symbionts, including Wolbachia, have been shown to protect their hosts from natural enemies. Hence, Wolbachia invasion may be facilitated by the dynamic interaction between it, its host, and a natural enemy. We model such an interaction whereby Wolbachia induces either complete resistance, partial resistance, or tolerance to a host-specific pathogen and also induces the common manipulation phenotype of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). We show that the presence of the pathogen greatly facilitates Wolbachia invasion from rare and widens the parameter space in which "imperfect" Wolbachia strains can invade. Furthermore, positive frequency-dependent selection through CI can drive Wolbachia to very high frequencies, potentially excluding the pathogen. These results may explain a poorly understood aspect of Wolbachia biology: it is widespread, despite performing poorly after transfer to new host species. They also support the intriguing possibility that Wolbachia strains that encode both CI and natural-enemy resistance could potentially rid insects, including human disease vectors, of important pathogens.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent6389573 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom333
dc.relation.ispartofpageto342
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAmerican Naturalist
dc.relation.ispartofvolume178
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPopulation ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHost-parasite interactions
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobial ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode31
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310307
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310407
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310703
dc.titleSolving the Wolbachia paradox: Modeling the tripartite interaction between host, Wolbachia and a natural enemy
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 by University of Chicago Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in The American Naturalist with publishing partner American Society of Naturalists. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBrownlie, Jeremy


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