Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNdehedehe, Christopher E
dc.contributor.authorUsman, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorOkwuashi, Onuwa
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Vagner G
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-18T01:17:31Z
dc.date.available2021-10-18T01:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2363-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40808-021-01302-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409156
dc.description.abstractSeveral tropical regions of the world, including West Africa are strong climatic hotspots where increase in extreme climatic events (e.g., droughts) impact water resources and hydro-ecological systems. Even though the West African Sahel has been widely studied, reports on the rainfall climatology of coastal West Africa are considerably limited. Assessing the evolutionary changes in rainfall in this region is crucial to improving the understanding on the impacts of global climate systems on rainfall variability. The main aim of this study is to assess the impact of climate change on the characteristics (mean annual, wettest month, driest month, and mean monthly) of coastal West African rainfall using General Circulation Model and two representative concentration pathways (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emission scenarios). Climate teleconnection induced rainfall is quantified using the partial least squares regression, and the dominant patterns of rainfall variability in the region are also assessed. The results indicate that areas along the coast with leading modes of rainfall variability and characterized by bimodal rainfall patterns are projected to receive highest rainfall in the mid (2041–2070) and end (2071–2100) of the century. However, inland areas are expected to receive low rainfall under the influence of both emission scenarios. An exception to this is the inland middle belt in Nigeria, which is projected to receive more rainfall than its surrounding areas. These results imply an intensification of the water cycle along the coastal region that could lead to increasing propensity of flood and drought events. Finally, Togo, Côte d’Ivoire, southern Ghana, Benin are hotspots in coastal West Africa where climate teleconnection patterns induce changes in rainfall.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofjournalModeling Earth Systems and Environment
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClimate change processes
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary impacts of climate change
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClimatology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSurface water hydrology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClimate change science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310406
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370704
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3702
dc.titleModelling impacts of climate change on coastal West African rainfall
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationNdehedehe, CE; Usman, M; Okwuashi, O; Ferreira, VG, Modelling impacts of climate change on coastal West African rainfall, Modeling Earth Systems and Environment
dc.date.updated2021-10-12T02:07:17Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG. This is an electronic version of an article published in Modeling Earth Systems and Environment, 2021. Modeling Earth Systems and Environment is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNdehedehe, Christopher E.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record