Show simple item record

dc.contributor.convenorAntony Moulis & Deborah van der Plaaten_AU
dc.contributor.authorLeach, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.editorAntony Moulis and Deborah van der Plaaten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:21:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:21:37Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-22T06:50:20Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.sahanz.net/conferences/index.htmlen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40915
dc.description.abstractThis paper takes a brief correspondence in 1946 between Erwin Panofsky and William S. Heckscher as a starting point for considering the status of the baroque in the historiography of art and architecture at the very beginning of the post-war era. In his critical edition of Panofsky's most widely read contribution to this theme, Irving Lavin cites a letter in which Panofsky dispatches a copy of his then-unpublished lecture What is Baroque? (dating from ca. 1934), recommending as he does so two other attempts to reconsider the term. This literature attends, in Panofsky's eyes, to the expanded scope and renewed importance the baroque sustained in the inter-war period at the hands of historians of painting and sculpture, literature and music. For a modern (and modernist) term that owes a great debt to the thinking done by W欦flin and his contemporaries in the 1880s and 1890s, what had become of the baroque through its broader application to the arts? The reflections by Panofsky and Stechow-and the discourse they index-offers a cross-section of thinking around this problem. This paper does not claim an undue influence of this body of work upon the post-war decades, but it does help historicise the possibilities that scholars saw in a term disarticulated from its formerly negative connotations, bound to cultural decay and the Counter Reformation project, and now operating within an expanded concept of the arts. It also raises as a question of timeliness the importance Stechow and his colleagues saw in regularising the meanings that had accrued to the term, and the importance Panofsky saw in the idea of the baroque in particular at that moment.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent92788 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSAHANZen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.sahanz.net/conferences/index.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename28th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAudience: Proceedings of the XXVIIIth International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-07-07en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-07-10en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchitectural History and Theoryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120103en_US
dc.titleThe Future of the Baroque, ca. 1945 : Panofsky, Stechow (and Middeldorf)en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 SAHANZ. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record