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dc.contributor.authorVoser, Tanja M
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Max D
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Anthony R
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-19T03:55:20Z
dc.date.available2021-10-19T03:55:20Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0265-0568
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/d1np00051a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409265
dc.description.abstractA key challenge in natural products research is the selection of biodiversity to yield novel chemistry. Recently, marine microorganisms have become a preferred source. But how novel are marine microorganism natural products compared to those reported from terrestrial microbes? Cluster analysis of chemical fingerprints and molecular scaffold analysis of 55 817 compounds reported from marine and terrestrial microorganisms, and marine macro-organisms showed that 76.7% of the compounds isolated from marine microorganisms are closely related to compounds isolated from terrestrial microorganisms. Only 14.3% of marine microorganism natural products are unique when marine macro-organism natural products are also considered. Studies targeting marine specific and understudied microbial phyla result in a higher likelihood of finding marine specific compounds, whereas the depth and geographic location of microorganism collection have little influence. We recommend marine targeted strain isolation, incorporating early use of genomic sequencing to guide strain selection, innovation in culture media and cultivation techniques and the application of cheminformatics tools to focus on unique natural product diversity, rather than the dereplication of known compounds.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNatural Product Reports
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNatural products and bioactive compounds
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOrganic chemistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnalytical biochemistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode340502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3405
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310101
dc.titleHow different are marine microbial natural products compared to their terrestrial counterparts?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationVoser, TM; Campbell, MD; Carroll, AR, How different are marine microbial natural products compared to their terrestrial counterparts?, Natural Product Reports
dc.date.updated2021-10-18T21:48:53Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Royal Society of Chemistry. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCarroll, Anthony R.
gro.griffith.authorVoser, Tanja M.
gro.griffith.authorCampbell, Max D.


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