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dc.contributor.authorThornton, CM
dc.contributor.authorShrestha, K
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T01:19:47Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T01:19:47Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1838-675X
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/SR20088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409432
dc.description.abstractIn the Brigalow Belt bioregion of Australia, clearing of brigalow (Acacia harpophylla) scrub vegetation for agriculture has altered nutrient cycling over millions of hectares. In order to quantify the effect of this vegetation clearing and land use change on soil fertility, the Brigalow Catchment Study commenced in 1965. Initial clearing and burning of brigalow scrub resulted in a temporary increase of mineral nitrogen, total and available phosphorus, total and exchangeable potassium and total sulfur in the surface soil (0-0.1 m) as a result of soil heating and the ash bed effect. Soil pH also increased, but did not peak immediately after burning. Soil fertility declined significantly over the subsequent 32 years. Under cropping, organic carbon declined by 46%, total nitrogen by 55%, total phosphorus by 29%, bicarbonate-extractable phosphorus by 54%, acid-extractable phosphorus by 59%, total sulfur by 49%, total potassium by 9% and exchangeable potassium by 63% from post-burn, pre-cropping concentrations. Fertility also declined under grazing but in a different pattern to that observed under cropping. Organic carbon showed clear fluctuation but it was not until the natural variation in soil fertility over time was separated from the anthropogenic effects of land use change that a significant decline was observed. Total nitrogen declined by 22%. Total phosphorus declined by 14%, equating to only half of the decline under cropping. Bicarbonate-extractable phosphorus declined by 64% and acid-extractable phosphorus by 66%; both greater than the decline observed under cropping. Total sulfur declined by 23%; less than half of the decline under cropping. A similar decline in total potassium was observed under both land uses, with a 10% decline under grazing. Exchangeable potassium declined by 59%. The primary mechanism of nutrient loss depended on the specific land use and nutrient in question.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom146
dc.relation.ispartofpageto169
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSoil Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSoil sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand capability and soil productivity
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode410601
dc.titleThe Brigalow Catchment Study: V∗. Clearing and burning brigalow (Acacia harpophylla) in Queensland, Australia, temporarily increases surface soil fertility prior to nutrient decline under cropping or grazing
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationThornton, CM; Shrestha, K, The Brigalow Catchment Study: V∗. Clearing and burning brigalow (Acacia harpophylla) in Queensland, Australia, temporarily increases surface soil fertility prior to nutrient decline under cropping or grazing, Soil Research, 2021, 59 (2), pp. 146-169
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-10-24T22:51:35Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© CSIRO 2020. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorThornton, Craig M.


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