Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStip, Emmanuel
dc.contributor.authorThibault, Alexis
dc.contributor.authorBeauchamp-Chatel, Alexis
dc.contributor.authorKisely, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-26T05:21:32Z
dc.date.available2021-10-26T05:21:32Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1664-0640
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409476
dc.description.abstractComputers, video games, and technological devices are part of young people's everyday lives. Hikikomori is a Japanese word describing a condition that mainly affects adolescents or young adults who live isolated from the world, cloistered within their parents' homes, locked in their bedrooms for days, months, or even years on end, and refusing to communicate even with their family. These patients use the Internet profusely, and only venture out to deal with their most imperative bodily needs. Although first described in Japan, cases have been described from around the world. This is the first published report from Canada. The disorder shares characteristics with prodromal psychosis, negative symptoms of schizophrenia, or Internet addiction, which are common differential or comorbid diagnoses. However, certain cases are not accompanied by a mental disorder. Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice although many cases are reluctant to present. The exact place of hikikomori in psychiatric nosology has yet to be determined. We searched Medline up to 12th May, 2015 supplemented by a hand search of the bibliographies of all retrieved articles. We used the following search terms: Hikikomori OR (prolonged AND social AND withdrawal). We found 97 potential papers. Of these 42 were in Japanese, and 1 in Korean. However, many of these were cited by subsequent English language papers that were included in the review. Following scrutiny of the titles and abstracts, 29 were judged to be relevant. Further research is needed to distinguish between primary and secondary hikikomori and establish whether this is a new diagnostic entity, or particular cultural or societal manifestations of established diagnoses.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPsychiatry
dc.subject.keywordshikikomori
dc.subject.keywordsInternet addiction
dc.titleInternet addiction, Hikikomori syndrome, and the prodromal phase of psychosis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStip, E; Thibault, A; Beauchamp-Chatel, A; Kisely, S, Internet addiction, Hikikomori syndrome, and the prodromal phase of psychosis, Frontiers in Psychiatry, 2016, 7, pp. 6
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-01-11
dc.date.updated2021-10-26T05:19:40Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKisely, Steve R.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record