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dc.contributor.authorKing, Myfanwy
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Tim
dc.contributor.authorAkcay, Zeynep
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-28T01:30:44Z
dc.date.available2021-10-28T01:30:44Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-030-88272-3
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-88272-3_12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409505
dc.description.abstractMental health literacy (MHL) is an important 21st Century skill. Good MHL can help to reduce barriers to help-seeking by equipping the public with the knowledge needed to help themselves or someone experiencing a mental illness. One Australian-based organization that does this through a training course is Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Australia. There are many digital interventions that aim to achieve this goal and serious games are no exception. Serious games have been identified as ideal for developing 21st Century skills, meaning MHL literacy is a promising candidate for serious games development. In fact, evidence suggest that serious games are effective as a tool for improving MHL. However, they often suffer from poor-quality game design, poor study design, high dropout rates, variability in studies and loss of motivation and engagement of players. This means that there are many challenges to consider when developing serious games. Here we describe our experiences in the development of a serious game prototype that utilizes the principles of MHFA. The aim of this development is to improve the confidence of players in delivering MHFA. Additionally, it aims to address the challenge of serious games quality by taking an artistic approach that combines narrative, aesthetics and mechanics using indie games for inspiration. There are many well-designed indie games that tell emotional and character driven stories of mental illness. They provide inspiration on the development of honest and relatable characters, which offer a positive representation of those experiencing a mental illness.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.publisher.placeCham, Switzerland
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameJoint International Conference on Serious Games (JCSG 2021)
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleLecture Notes in Computer Science
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2021-10-07
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2021-10-08
dc.relation.ispartoflocationStoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom153
dc.relation.ispartofpageto166
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12945
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSerious games
dc.subject.fieldofresearchScreen and digital media
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInteraction and experience design
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode460706
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330310
dc.titleUsing Indie Games to Inform Serious Mental Health Games Design
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKing, M; Marsh, T; Akcay, Z, Using Indie Games to Inform Serious Mental Health Games Design, Joint International Conference on Serious Games (JCSG 2021), 2021, pp. 153-166
dc.date.updated2021-10-25T04:30:57Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMarsh, Tim
gro.griffith.authorAkcay, Zeynep
gro.griffith.authorKing, Myfanwy M.
dc.subject.socioeconomiccode130101 Design


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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