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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, A
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, L
dc.contributor.authorGrimley, R
dc.contributor.authorGullo, H
dc.contributor.authorRosbergen, I
dc.contributor.authorSummers, M
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-28T01:35:53Z
dc.date.available2021-10-28T01:35:53Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1747-4930
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409506
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cognitive impairment is common post-stroke. There is a need to understand patterns of early cognitive recovery post-stroke to guide both clinical and research practice. Aims: To map the trajectory of cognitive recovery during the first week to 90-days post-stroke using serial computerised assessment. Methods: An observational cohort study recruited consecutive stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit within 48 hours of onset. Cognitive function was assessed using the computerised Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) daily for seven days, then 14, 30 and 90-days post-stroke. The CANTAB measured visual episodic memory and learning, information processing speed, visuo-spatial working memory, complex sustained attention, and mental flexibility. Repeated measures MANOVA/ANOVA with Least Squares Difference post-hoc analysis were performed to ascertain significant change over time. Results: Forty-eight participants with primarily mild, ischaemic stroke completed all time-points for analysis. For all subtests, significant improvement in performance was captured at multiple assessment points. In the first week post-stroke, a distinct period of early, rapid, global cognitive improvement was found, that largely stabilized between 8 and 14 days post mild stroke. Conclusions: Serial, computerised cognitive assessment can effectively map post-stroke cognitive recovery and revealed an early phase of rapid global improvement that is evidence for an acute post-stroke delirium. Post-stroke delirium appears to be far more common than is appreciated and can be measured. Resolution of post-stroke delirium in the second week following mild stroke indicates more extensive neuropsychological testing can be undertaken earlier than previously thought.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd
dc.publisher.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/17474930211036296
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameStroke Society of Australasia Annual Scientific Meeting
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleInternational Journal of Stroke
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2021-10-13
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2021-10-15
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPerth Australia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom7
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7
dc.relation.ispartofissue1_suppl
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3209
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsClinical Neurology
dc.subject.keywordsPeripheral Vascular Disease
dc.subject.keywordsNeurology
dc.titleMapping the trajectory of acute post-stroke cognitive recovery
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conferences (Extract Paper)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCampbell, A; Gustafsson, L; Grimley, R; Gullo, H; Rosbergen, I; Summers, M, Mapping the trajectory of acute post-stroke cognitive recovery, International Journal of Stroke, 2021, 16 (1_suppl), pp. 7-7
dc.date.updated2021-10-27T22:14:25Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGustafsson, Louise
gro.griffith.authorGrimley, Rohan


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