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dc.contributor.authorStanisic, Danielle I
dc.contributor.authorHo, Mei-Fong
dc.contributor.authorNevagi, Reshma
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Emily
dc.contributor.authorWalton, Maddison
dc.contributor.authorIslam, Md Tanjir
dc.contributor.authorHussein, Waleed M
dc.contributor.authorSkwarczynski, Mariusz
dc.contributor.authorToth, Istvan
dc.contributor.authorGood, Michael F
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-28T06:15:06Z
dc.date.available2021-10-28T06:15:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2150-7511
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mbio.02657-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409533
dc.description.abstractInfection with malaria parasites continues to be a major global public health issue. While current control measures have enabled a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality over the last 20 years, additional tools will be required if we are to progress toward malaria parasite eradication. Malaria vaccine research has focused on the development of subunit vaccines; however, more recently, interest in whole-parasite vaccines has reignited. Whole-parasite vaccines enable the presentation of a broad repertoire of antigens to the immune system, which limits the impact of antigenic polymorphism and genetic restriction of the immune response. We previously reported that whole-parasite vaccines can be prepared using chemically attenuated parasites within intact red blood cells or using killed parasites in liposomes, although liposomes were less immunogenic than attenuated parasites. If they could be frozen or freeze-dried and be made more immunogenic, liposomal vaccines would be ideal for vaccine deployment in areas where malaria is endemic. Here, we develop and evaluate a Plasmodium yoelii liposomal vaccine with enhanced immunogenicity and efficacy due to incorporation of TLR4 agonist, 3D(6-acyl) PHAD, and mannose to target the liposome to antigen-presenting cells. Following vaccination, mice were protected, and strong cellular immune responses were induced, characterized by parasite-specific splenocyte proliferation and a mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine response. Parasite-specific antibodies were induced, predominantly of the IgG1 subclass. CD4+ T cells and gamma interferon were critical components of the protective immune response. This study represents an important development toward evaluation of this whole-parasite blood-stage vaccine in a phase I clinical trial.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
dc.relation.ispartofjournalmBio
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical parasitology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320704
dc.titleDevelopment and Evaluation of a Cryopreserved Whole-Parasite Vaccine in a Rodent Model of Blood-Stage Malaria
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStanisic, DI; Ho, M-F; Nevagi, R; Cooper, E; Walton, M; Islam, MT; Hussein, WM; Skwarczynski, M; Toth, I; Good, MF, Development and Evaluation of a Cryopreserved Whole-Parasite Vaccine in a Rodent Model of Blood-Stage Malaria, mBio
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-10-24T21:57:59Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Stanisic et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStanisic, Danielle
gro.griffith.authorGood, Michael F.
gro.griffith.authorHo, Mei Fong
gro.griffith.authorNevagi, Reshma J.
gro.griffith.authorCooper, Emily K.
gro.griffith.authorWalton, Maddie J.


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