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dc.contributor.authorUsher, Kim
dc.contributor.authorDurkin, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Sam
dc.contributor.authorVanderslott, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorVindrola-Padros, Cecilia
dc.contributor.authorUsher, Luke
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Debra
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-28T06:46:18Z
dc.date.available2021-10-28T06:46:18Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/29025en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409539
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Measuring public response during COVID-19 is an important way of ensuring the suitability and effectiveness of epidemic response efforts. An analysis of social media provides an approximation of public sentiment during an emergency like the current pandemic. The measures introduced across the globe to help curtail the spread of the coronavirus have led to the development of a situation labeled as a "perfect storm," triggering a wave of domestic violence. As people use social media to communicate their experiences, analyzing public discourse and sentiment on social platforms offers a way to understand concerns and issues related to domestic violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study was based on an analysis of public discourse and sentiment related to domestic violence during the stay-at-home periods of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia in 2020. It aimed to understand the more personal self-reported experiences, emotions, and reactions toward domestic violence that were not always classified or collected by official public bodies during the pandemic. METHODS: We searched social media and news posts in Australia using key terms related to domestic violence and COVID-19 during 2020 via digital analytics tools to determine sentiments related to domestic violence during this period. RESULTS: The study showed that the use of sentiment and discourse analysis to assess social media data is useful in measuring the public expression of feelings and sharing of resources in relation to the otherwise personal experience of domestic violence. There were a total of 63,800 posts across social media and news media. Within these posts, our analysis found that domestic violence was mentioned an average of 179 times a day. There were 30,100 tweets, 31,700 news reports, 1500 blog posts, 548 forum posts, and 7 comments (posted on news and blog websites). Negative or neutral sentiment centered on the sharp rise in domestic violence during different lockdown periods of the 2020 pandemic, and neutral and positive sentiments centered on praise for efforts that raised awareness of domestic violence as well as the positive actions of domestic violence charities and support groups in their campaigns. There were calls for a positive and proactive handling (rather than a mishandling) of the pandemic, and results indicated a high level of public discontent related to the rising rates of domestic violence and the lack of services during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided a timely understanding of public sentiment related to domestic violence during the COVID-19 lockdown periods in Australia using social media analysis. Social media represents an important avenue for the dissemination of information; posts can be widely dispersed and easily accessed by a range of different communities who are often difficult to reach. An improved understanding of these issues is important for future policy direction. Heightened awareness of this could help agencies tailor and target messaging to maximize impact.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome29025en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Medical Internet Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation and computing sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode46en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Care Sciences & Servicesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMedical Informaticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCOVID-19en_US
dc.titlePublic Sentiment and Discourse on Domestic Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Australia: Analysis of Social Media Postsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationUsher, K; Durkin, J; Martin, S; Vanderslott, S; Vindrola-Padros, C; Usher, L; Jackson, D, Public Sentiment and Discourse on Domestic Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Australia: Analysis of Social Media Posts, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2021, 23 (10), pp. e29025en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-04
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-25T21:54:53Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© Kim Usher, Joanne Durkin, Sam Martin, Samantha Vanderslott, Cecilia Vindrola-Padros, Luke Usher, Debra Jackson. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (https://www.jmir.org), 01.10.2021. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorUsher, Kim J.


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