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dc.contributor.authorStulz, Virginia M
dc.contributor.authorBradfield, Zoe
dc.contributor.authorCummins, Allison
dc.contributor.authorCatling, Christine
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Linda
dc.contributor.authorMcInnes, Rhona
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlin, Karen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Jan
dc.contributor.authorHartz, Donna
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Athena
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-01T04:52:00Z
dc.date.available2021-11-01T04:52:00Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1871-5192
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2021.10.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409598
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused isolation, fear, and impacted on maternal healthcare provision. AIM: To explore midwives' experiences about how COVID-19 impacted their ability to provide woman-centred care, and what lessons they have learnt as a result of the mandated government and hospital restrictions (such as social distancing) during the care of the woman and her family. METHODS: A qualitative interpretive descriptive study was conducted. Twenty-six midwives working in all models of care in all states and territories of Australia were recruited through social media, and selected using a maximum variation sampling approach. Data were collected through in-depth interviews between May to August, 2020. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. FINDINGS: Two overarching themes were identified: 'COVID-19 causing chaos' and 'keeping the woman at the centre of care'. The 'COVID-19 causing chaos' theme included three sub-themes: 'quickly evolving situation', 'challenging to provide care', and 'affecting women and families'. The 'Keeping the woman at the centre of care' theme included three sub-themes: 'trying to keep it normal', 'bending the rules and pushing the boundaries', and 'quality time for the woman, baby, and family unit'. CONCLUSION: Findings of this study offer important evidence regarding the impact of the pandemic on the provision of woman-centred care which is key to midwifery philosophy. Recommendations are made for ways to preserve and further enhance woman-centred care during periods of uncertainty such as during a pandemic or other health crises.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen Birth
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMidwifery
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4204
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.keywordsCOVID-19
dc.subject.keywordsCommunication
dc.subject.keywordsFear
dc.subject.keywordsQualitative research
dc.titleMidwives providing woman-centred care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia: A national qualitative study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStulz, VM; Bradfield, Z; Cummins, A; Catling, C; Sweet, L; McInnes, R; McLaughlin, K; Taylor, J; Hartz, D; Sheehan, A, Midwives providing woman-centred care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia: A national qualitative study, Women Birth, 2021
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-11
dc.date.updated2021-10-27T23:48:04Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcInnes, Rhona J.


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