Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorvan der Laan, CM
dc.contributor.authorMorosoli-García, JJ
dc.contributor.authorvan de Weijer, SGA
dc.contributor.authorColodro-Conde, L
dc.contributor.authorIp, HF
dc.contributor.authorKrapohl, EML
dc.contributor.authorBrikell, I
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Mora, C
dc.contributor.authorNolte, IM
dc.contributor.authorPourcain, BS
dc.contributor.authorBolhuis, K
dc.contributor.authorPalviainen, T
dc.contributor.authorZafarmand, H
dc.contributor.authorGordon, S
dc.contributor.authoret al.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-01T05:30:32Z
dc.date.available2021-11-01T05:30:32Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0001-8244en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10519-021-10076-6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409606
dc.description.abstractWe test whether genetic influences that explain individual differences in aggression in early life also explain individual differences across the life-course. In two cohorts from The Netherlands (N = 13,471) and Australia (N = 5628), polygenic scores (PGSs) were computed based on a genome-wide meta-analysis of childhood/adolescence aggression. In a novel analytic approach, we ran a mixed effects model for each age (Netherlands: 12–70 years, Australia: 16–73 years), with observations at the focus age weighted as 1, and decaying weights for ages further away. We call this approach a ‘rolling weights’ model. In The Netherlands, the estimated effect of the PGS was relatively similar from age 12 to age 41, and decreased from age 41–70. In Australia, there was a peak in the effect of the PGS around age 40 years. These results are a first indication from a molecular genetics perspective that genetic influences on aggressive behavior that are expressed in childhood continue to play a role later in life.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom592en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto606en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBehavior Geneticsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume51en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4402en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3209en_US
dc.subject.keywordsAggressionen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAggressive behavioren_US
dc.subject.keywordsDevelopmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife-courseen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPolygenic scoreen_US
dc.titleContinuity of Genetic Risk for Aggressive Behavior Across the Life-Courseen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationvan der Laan, CM; Morosoli-García, JJ; van de Weijer, SGA; Colodro-Conde, L; Ip, HF; Krapohl, EML; Brikell, I; Sánchez-Mora, C; Nolte, IM; Pourcain, BS; Bolhuis, K; Palviainen, T; Zafarmand, H; Gordon, S; et al., Continuity of Genetic Risk for Aggressive Behavior Across the Life-Course, Behavior Genetics, 2021, 51 (5), pp. 592-606en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-23
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-27T22:14:18Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVan de Weijer, Steve


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record