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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Sarah J
dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Lynne
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Erin E
dc.contributor.authorSlattery, Maddy
dc.contributor.authorO’Donovan, Analise
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-02T04:58:06Z
dc.date.available2021-11-02T04:58:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1476-0835
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/papt.12369
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409672
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Clinical supervision is essential for ensuring effective service delivery. International imperatives to demonstrate professional competence has increased attention on the role of supervision in enhancing client outcomes. Although supervisor competency tools are recognised as important components in effective supervision, there remains a shortage of tools that are evidenced-based, applicable across workforces and freely accessible. Design: An expert multidisciplinary group developed the Generic Supervision Assessment Tool (GSAT) to assess supervisor competencies across a range of professions. Initially the GSAT consisted of 32 items responded to by either a supervisor (GSAT-SR) or supervisee (GSAT-SE). The current study, using surveys, employed a cross-sectional design to test the reliability and construct validity of the GSAT. Methods: The study consisted of two phases and included 12 professional groups across Australasia. In 2018, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was undertaken with survey data from 479 supervisors and 447 supervisees. In 2019 survey data from 182 supervisors and 186 supervisees were used to conduct confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results were used to refine and validate the GSAT. Results: The final GSAT-SR has four factors with 26 competency items. The final GSAT-SE has two factors with 21 competency items. The EFA and CFA confirmed that the GSAT-SR and the GSAT-SE are psychometrically valid tools that supervisors and supervisees can utilise to assess competencies. Conclusion: As a non-discipline specific supervision tool, the GSAT is a validated, freely available tool for benchmarking the competencies of clinical supervisors across professions, potentially optimising supervisory evaluation processes and strengthening supervision effectiveness.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAllied health and rehabilitation science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4201
dc.titleSupporting conscious competency: Validation of the Generic Supervision Assessment Tool (GSAT)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHamilton, SJ; Briggs, L; Peterson, EE; Slattery, M; O’Donovan, A, Supporting conscious competency: Validation of the Generic Supervision Assessment Tool (GSAT), Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice
dc.date.updated2021-11-02T04:31:54Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBriggs, Lynne
gro.griffith.authorSlattery, Maddy E.
gro.griffith.authorO'Donovan, Analise
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, Sarah J.


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