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dc.contributor.authorBowden, Tracey
dc.contributor.authorHurt, Catherine S
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Julie
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Leanne M
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-02T05:38:28Z
dc.date.available2021-11-02T05:38:28Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1474-5151
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/eurjcn/zvab086
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409682
dc.description.abstractAims: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is often experienced by cardiac surgery patients; however, it is not known if some groups of patients experience this more frequently or severely than others. The aim of this systematic review was to identify preoperative and postoperative predictors of cognitive dysfunction in adults following cardiac surgery. Methods and results: Eight bibliographic databases were searched (January 2005 to March 2021) in relation to cardiac surgery and cognition. Studies including adult patients who had undergone open cardiac surgery and using a validated measurement of cognitive function were included. Full-text review for inclusion, quality assessment, and data extraction were undertaken independently by two authors. A total of 2870 papers were identified, of which 36 papers met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The majority were prospective observational studies [n = 28 (75.7%)]. In total, 61 independent predictors (45 preoperative and 16 postoperative) were identified as significant in at least one study; advancing age and education level appear important. Age has emerged as the most common predictor of cognitive outcome. Conclusion: Although a number of predictors of POCD have been identified, they have inconsistently been reported as significantly affecting cognitive outcome. Consistent with previous research, our findings indicate that older patients and those with lower educational levels should be prioritized when developing and trialling interventions to improve cognitive function. These findings are less than surprising if we consider the methodological shortcomings of included studies. It is evident that further high-quality research exploring predictors of POCD is required.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320101
dc.titlePredictors of cognitive dysfunction after cardiac surgery: a systematic review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBowden, T; Hurt, CS; Sanders, J; Aitken, LM, Predictors of cognitive dysfunction after cardiac surgery: a systematic review, European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-11-02T01:34:57Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAitken, Leanne M.


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