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dc.contributor.authorWelsh, J
dc.contributor.authorKorda, RJ
dc.contributor.authorPaige, E
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, MA
dc.contributor.authorLaw, HD
dc.contributor.authorStanton, T
dc.contributor.authorBourne, ZM
dc.contributor.authorTolosa, MX
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, K
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-04T04:14:05Z
dc.date.available2021-11-04T04:14:05Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2209-6051
dc.identifier.doi10.33321/cdi.2021.45.51
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409786
dc.description.abstractBackground: To date, there are limited Australian data on characteristics of people diagnosed with COVID-19 and on how these characteristics relate to outcomes. The ATHENA COVID-19 Study was established to describe health outcomes and investigate predictors of outcomes for all people diagnosed with COVID-19 in Queensland by linking COVID-19 notification, hospital, general practice and death registry data. This paper reports on the establishment and first findings for the ATHENA COVID-19 Study. Methods: Part 1 of the ATHENA COVID-19 Study used Notifiable Conditions System data from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2020, linked to: Emergency Department Collection data for the same period; Queensland Health Admitted Patient Data Collections (from 1 January 2010 to 30 January 2021); and Deaths Registrations data (from 1 January 2020 to 17 January 2021). Results: To 31 December 2020, a total of 1,254 people had been diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Queensland: half were female (49.8%); two-thirds (67.7%) were aged 20-59 years; and there was an over-representation of people living in less-disadvantaged areas. More than half of people diagnosed (57.6%) presented to an ED; 21.2% were admitted to hospital as an inpatient (median length of stay 11 days); 1.4% were admitted to an intensive care unit (82.4% of these required ventilation); and there were six deaths. Analysis of factors associated with these outcomes was limited due to small case numbers: people living in less-disadvantaged areas had a lower risk of being admitted to hospital (test for trend, p < 0.001), while those living in more remote areas were less likely than people living in major cities to present to an ED (test for trend: p=0.007), which may reflect differential health care access rather than health outcomes per se. Increasing age (test for trend, p < 0.001) and being a current/recent smoker (age-sex-adjusted relative risk: 1.61; 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 2.61) were associated with a higher risk of being admitted to hospital. Conclusion: Despite uncertainty in our estimates due to small numbers, our findings are consistent with what is known about COVID-19. Our findings reinforce the value of linking multiple data sources to enhance reporting of outcomes for people diagnosed with COVID-19 and provide a platform for longer term follow-up.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherAustralian Government Department of Health
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCommunicable Diseases Intelligence
dc.relation.ispartofvolume45
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4202
dc.subject.keywordsepidemiology
dc.subject.keywordsmorbidity
dc.subject.keywordsoutcomes
dc.subject.keywordspredictors
dc.subject.keywordsrecord linkage
dc.titleThe ATHENA COVID-19 Study: Cohort profile and first findings for people diagnosed with COVID-19 in Queensland, 1 January to 31 December 2020
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWelsh, J; Korda, RJ; Paige, E; Morgan, MA; Law, HD; Stanton, T; Bourne, ZM; Tolosa, MX; Greaves, K, The ATHENA COVID-19 Study: Cohort profile and first findings for people diagnosed with COVID-19 in Queensland, 1 January to 31 December 2020, Communicable diseases intelligence, 2021, 45
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-11-04T03:57:37Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Commonwealth of Australia as represented by the Department of Health. This publication is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionNon-Commercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence from https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode (Licence). You must read and understand the Licence before using any material from this publication.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStanton, Tony
gro.griffith.authorGreaves, Kim


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