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dc.contributor.authorDark, Frances
dc.contributor.authorWhiteford, Harvey
dc.contributor.authorAshkanasy, Neal M
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Carol
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Meredith
dc.contributor.authorCrompton, David
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Ellie
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-07T06:06:20Z
dc.date.available2021-11-07T06:06:20Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1752-4458en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13033-016-0116-0en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409890
dc.description.abstractBackground: Strategies to implement evidence-based practice have highlighted the bidirectional relationship of organisational change on organisational culture. The present study examined changes in perceptions of organisational culture in two community mental health services implementing cognitive therapies into routine psychosis care over 3 years. During the time of the study there were a number of shared planned and unplanned changes that the mental health services had to accommodate. One service, Metro South, had the additional challenge of embarking on a major organisational restructure. Methods: A survey of organisational culture was administered to clinical staff of each service at yearly intervals over the 3 years. Results: At baseline assessment there was no significant difference between the two services in organisational culture. At the midpoint assessment, which was conducted at the time the Metro South restructure was operationalized, there were less positive ratings of organisational culture recorded in Metro South compared to the other service. Organisational culture returned to near-baseline levels at endpoint assessment. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the literature that organisational culture is relatively robust and resilient. It is also consistent with the literature that, at any one time, a service or organisation may have a finite capacity to absorb change. Consequently this limitation needs to be taken into account in the timing and planning of major service reform where possible. The results also extend the literature, insofar as external factors with a high impact on the operation of an organisation may impact upon organisational culture albeit temporarily.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsOrganisational changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordsOrganisational cultureen_US
dc.titleThe impact of organisational change and fiscal restraint on organisational cultureen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDark, F; Whiteford, H; Ashkanasy, NM; Harvey, C; Harris, M; Crompton, D; Newman, E, The impact of organisational change and fiscal restraint on organisational culture, International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 2017, 11 (1), pp. 11en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-23
dc.date.updated2021-11-07T06:03:11Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCrompton, David R.


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