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dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Amy E
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Jennifer A
dc.contributor.authorMorawska, Alina
dc.contributor.authorRamsbotham, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsy
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-07T06:16:20Z
dc.date.available2021-11-07T06:16:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0020-7489en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2016.09.016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/409894
dc.description.abstractBackground: The development of child behaviour and parenting difficulties is understood to undermine treatment outcomes for children with atopic dermatitis. Past research has reported on correlates of child behaviour difficulties. However, few research studies have sought to examine parenting confidence and practices in this clinical group. Objectives: To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parent-reported and directly-observed child and parent behaviour, parents’ self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, self-reported parenting strategies, and disease severity. Design: Cross-sectional study design. Participants: Parent-child dyads (N = 64) were recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Children had a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis of ≥3 months and no other chronic health conditions except asthma, allergic rhinitis, or allergy. Methods: Parents completed self-report measures assessing child behaviour; parent depression, anxiety, and stress; parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction; self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, and use of ineffective parenting strategies; and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, and performance of atopic dermatitis management tasks. The Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index was used to assess disease severity. Routine at-home treatment sessions were coded for parent and child behaviour. Results: Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified relationships (p < 0.05) between self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour and child behaviour problems, parent depression and stress, parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction, and household income. There were also relationships between each of these variables and use of ineffective parenting strategies. Greater use of ineffective parenting strategies was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis. Using multiple linear regressions, child behaviour and household income explained unique variance in self-efficacy for managing difficult child behaviour; household income alone explained unique variance in use of ineffective parenting strategies. Self-efficacy for managing difficult child behaviour and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis were positively correlated (rho = 0.48, p < 0.001), and more successful self-reported performance of atopic dermatitis management tasks correlated with less permissive (r = 0.35, p = 0.005) and less authoritarian (r = 0.41, p = 0.001) parenting. Directly observed aversive child behaviour was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, parent stress, and parent-reported child behaviour problems. Conclusion: This study revealed relationships between parents’ self-efficacy and parenting practices across the domains of child behaviour management and atopic dermatitis management. Parents of children with more severe atopic dermatitis may have difficulty responding to child behaviour difficulties appropriately, potentially impacting on illness management. Incorporating parent and parenting support within treatment plans may improve not only child and family wellbeing, but also treatment outcomes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom72en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto85en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume64en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsChild behaviouren_US
dc.subject.keywordsChronic disease managementen_US
dc.titleParenting and childhood atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study of relationships between parenting behaviour, skin care management, and disease severity in young childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMitchell, AE; Fraser, JA; Morawska, A; Ramsbotham, J; Yates, P, Parenting and childhood atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study of relationships between parenting behaviour, skin care management, and disease severity in young children, International Journal of Nursing Studies, 2016, 64, pp. 72-85en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-21
dc.date.updated2021-11-07T06:14:43Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMitchell, Amy


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