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dc.contributor.authorBerdejo‐Espinola, Violeta
dc.contributor.authorSuárez‐Castro, Andrés F
dc.contributor.authorAmano, Tatsuya
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Kelly S
dc.contributor.authorOh, Rachel Rui Ying
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Richard A
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-11T03:49:34Z
dc.date.available2021-11-11T03:49:34Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2575-8314
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pan3.10218
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410052
dc.description.abstractSpending time in nature is one potential way to cope with the negative physical and psychological health impacts from major stressful life events. In 2020, a large fraction of the global population was impacted by restrictions to contain the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, a period characterised by marked health risks and behavioural changes. Here we explore whether people responded to this stressor by spending more time in nature and investigate the reasons for any changes. We surveyed 1,002 people in Brisbane, Australia in 2020, to measure the change in use of green space during the restrictions period and benefits people associated with visiting them. About 36% of participants increased their urban green space use, but 26% reduced it, indicating a great deal of flux. Furthermore, 45% of the previous non-users of urban green space began using it for the first time during the restrictions period. Older people were less likely to increase their green space use and those with a backyard were more likely to increase their use of green spaces. Participants' change in use occurred regardless of the amount of green space available in close proximity to their households. In addition, we did not find a relationship between nature-relatedness and change in use. People's reasons for green space use shifted during the pandemic-related restrictions period, with many emphasising improvement of personal well-being rather than consolidating community capital. Most participants indicated an increase in the importance of the psychological and physical benefits obtained from urban green spaces. We conclude that increased urban green space use during moments of stress such as the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to ameliorate some of the negative effects of the stressor, but that the capacity and desire to spend more time in green space varies markedly across society. Sufficient urban green space provision for all sections of society will maximise the opportunity to employ a nature-based coping mechanism during times of personal or community stress.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom597
dc.relation.ispartofpageto609
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPeople and Nature
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and regional planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban analysis and development
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3304
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330410
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.titleUrban green space use during a time of stress: A case study during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Brisbane, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBerdejo‐Espinola, V; Suárez‐Castro, AF; Amano, T; Fielding, KS; Oh, RRY; Fuller, RA, Urban green space use during a time of stress: A case study during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Brisbane, Australia, People and Nature, 2021, 3 (3), pp. 597-609
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-11-11T03:25:15Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSuarez Castro, Andres Felipe


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