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dc.contributor.authorChuter, Vivienne H
dc.contributor.authorSpink, Martin J
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Michael
dc.contributor.authorLanting, Sean
dc.contributor.authorSearle, Angela
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T03:50:23Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T03:50:23Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1757-1146en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13047-021-00494-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410170
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: High plantar pressures are associated with increased foot ulcer risk in people with diabetes. Identification of high plantar pressures in people with diabetes is clinically challenging due to time and cost constraints of plantar pressure testing. Factors affecting foot biomechanics, including reduced joint range of motion and foot deformity, are implicated in the development of high plantar pressures and may provide a method to clinically identify those at risk of pressure related complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of joint range of motion and foot deformity measures on plantar pressures in a community dwelling group with diabetes. METHODS: Barefoot (Tekscan HR Mat™) and in-shoe (Novel Pedar-X®) plantar pressure variables, weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion, hallux range of motion, lesser toe deformities and hallux abductus (HAV) scale were assessed in 136 adults with diabetes (52.2% male; mean age 68.4 years). Multivariate multiple linear regression was used to assess the effect of the four biomechanical factors plus neuropathy and body mass index on plantar pressure variables. Non-parametric bootstrapping was employed to determine the difference in plantar pressure variables for participants with two or more foot biomechanical pathologies compared to those with less than two pathologies. RESULTS: Almost one third (32%) of the cohort had two or more foot biomechanical pathologies. Participants with two or more foot biomechanical pathologies displayed significant increases in all barefoot plantar pressure regions (except forefoot), compared to those with less than two pathologies. No significant changes were found for the in-shoe plantar pressure variables. The regression model explains between 9.9% (95%CI: 8.4 to 11.4%) and 29.6% (95% CI: 28.2 to 31%), and between 2.5% (1.0 to 4.0%) and 43.8% (95% CI: 42.5-44.9%), of the variance in the barefoot and in-shoe plantar pressure variables respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Participants presenting with two or more factors affecting foot biomechanics displayed higher peak pressures and pressure time integrals in all foot regions compared to those with less than two factors. The tests used in this study could help clinicians detect elevated plantar pressures in people with diabetes and present an opportunity for early preventative interventions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom56en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports medicineen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTraditional, complementary and integrative medicineen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320225en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4208en_US
dc.subject.keywordsBiomechanicalen_US
dc.subject.keywordsDiabetesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPlantar pressureen_US
dc.titleClinical foot measurements as a proxy for plantar pressure testing in people with diabetesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationChuter, VH; Spink, MJ; David, M; Lanting, S; Searle, A, Clinical foot measurements as a proxy for plantar pressure testing in people with diabetes, Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 2021, 14 (1), pp. 56en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-22
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-11-11T01:27:08Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2021 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
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gro.griffith.authorDavid, Michael


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