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dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-22T02:21:49Z
dc.date.available2021-11-22T02:21:49Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410279
dc.description.abstractThe image of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is often quite low in many countries. This includes those with advanced industrial economies as well those with developing economies. The outcomes of having such a low image include a reluctance of young people and their parents to consider TVET as a viable educational option, viewing participation in it as a second option at best. In addition, low image can lead to reduced government, industry and enterprise sponsorship and support of TVET, thereby adding to its lack of attractiveness for young people. Yet, there is often a mismatch between the worth and benefits of TVET and decision-making about it. As a consequence, it is necessary to identify what factors shape the image of TVET and what initiatives can be enacted so that this important educational sector is considered on its own merits, and supported more by the community, government and employers. In this way, it more likely to achieve its educational goals for young people, their communities, workplaces and nations. The virtual conference focused on these important issues. Organized on the occasion of World Youth Skills Day 2018, this virtual conference aimed to engage with this issue by initiating, guiding and synthesising a range of perspectives, evidence and advice about the factors influencing the image of TVET and the occupations it serves and, importantly how these can be addressed to make TVET attractive to youth. The virtual conference was hosted by UNESCO-UNEVOC from 16 to 24 July 2018 on the TVeT Forum. Professor Stephen Billett, Griffith University, Australia, moderated the online activities over the nine-day period. The virtual conference attracted 346 participants from 82 countries. Many participated directly in the online discussions. The conference provided opportunities for participants to share perspectives and information about the image of TVET and to offer suggestions on how that image could be enhanced in their countries, and elsewhere, to make TVET more attractive to young people. The discussions were informed by earlier studies and discussions (TVeT Forum threads and other workshops) and by resources provided throughout the conference. The contributions to and outcomes of the discussion on each topic were made available to participants prior to and during the virtual conference. Additionally, other resources and links to initiatives undertaken globally associated with this important topic were shared.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizationen_US
dc.publisherUNESCO-UNEVOCen_US
dc.publisher.placeBonn, Germanyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://unevoc.unesco.org/up/vc_synthesis_21.pdfen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVocational education and training curriculum and pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTechnical, further and workplace educationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390114en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390308en_US
dc.titleImproving the image of TVET: Making TVET attractive to youthen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBillett, S, Improving the image of TVET: Making TVET attractive to youth, 2018en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-11-20T21:54:23Z
gro.rights.copyright© UNESCO-UNEVOC/Elena Shvelidze. This publication is available in Open Access under the AttributionShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC-BY-SA 3.0 IGO) license (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/). By using the content of this publication, the users accept to be bound by the terms of use of the UNESCO Open Access Repository (http://www.unesco.org/open-access/terms-useccbysa-en).en_US
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gro.griffith.authorBillett, Stephen R.


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