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dc.contributor.authorMcCarter, Joe
dc.contributor.authorGavin, Michael C
dc.contributor.authorBaereleo, Sue
dc.contributor.authorLove, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-25T02:04:52Z
dc.date.available2021-11-25T02:04:52Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1708-3087en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5751/ES-06741-190339en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410345
dc.description.abstractIncreased interest in indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK) has led to concern that it is vulnerable amidst social and ecological change. In response, multiple authors have recommended the establishment of programs for the maintenance and revitalization of IEK systems. However, few studies have analyzed the methods, opportunities, and challenges of these programs. This is a critical gap, as IEK maintenance is challenging and will require layered and evidence-based solutions. We seek to build a foundation for future approaches to IEK maintenance. First, we present a systematic literature review of IEK maintenance programs (n = 39) and discuss the opportunities and challenges inherent in five broad groups of published approaches. Second, we use two case studies from the Republic of Vanuatu to illustrate these challenges in more depth. The first case study takes a community-based approach, which has inherent strengths (e.g., localized organization). It has, however, faced practical (e.g., funding) and epistemological (changing modes of knowledge transmission) challenges. The second case study seeks to facilitate IEK transmission within the formal school system. Although this model has potential, it has faced significant challenges (e.g., lack of institutional linkages). We conclude that supporting and strengthening IEK is important but that serious attention is needed to account for the social, situated, and dynamic nature of IEK. In closing, we use the review and case studies to propose four principles that may guide adaptive and flexible approaches for the future maintenance of IEK systems.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherResilience Alliance, Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEcology and Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen_US
dc.titleThe challenges of maintaining indigenous ecological knowledgeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMcCarter, J; Gavin, MC; Baereleo, S; Love, M, The challenges of maintaining indigenous ecological knowledge, Ecology and Society, 2014, 19 (3)en_US
dc.date.updated2021-11-25T00:16:09Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author(s).en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLove, Mark W.


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