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dc.contributor.authorTheobald, Karen A
dc.contributor.authorTutticci, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorRamsbotham, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-26T03:52:27Z
dc.date.available2021-11-26T03:52:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1471-5953
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nepr.2021.103220
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410392
dc.description.abstractAim/objective This systematic review examines the effectiveness of undergraduate nursing students’ using simulation to acquire clinical reasoning. Background: Use of simulation to positively impact practice outcomes is an established method in nursing education. Clinical reasoning is a graduate capability that contributes to safe practice, so developing clinical reasoning requires explicit scaffolding in undergraduate contexts. While research has primarily evaluated specific clinical reasoning frameworks, variability in clinical reasoning definitions has obscured simulation efficacy for clinical reasoning acquisition. Design: This review uses the Joanna Briggs Institute Systematic Reviews approach. Methods: An electronic database search was conducted to identify studies published from May 2009 to January 2020 using a three-step search strategy. Selected papers were assessed by at least two independent reviewers for inclusion criteria, methodological validity, and data extraction. Ten studies using quasi-experimental designs involving 1532 students were included. Results: Evidence regarding the effectiveness of simulation for undergraduate nursing students’ acquisition of clinical reasoning was limited but of high quality. Review results showed no statistically significant gains in clinical reasoning with a single simulation exposure. Two emerging concepts, situation awareness and teamwork support the enhancement of clinical reasoning within simulation. In order to draw future conclusions on the efficacy of simulation to develop clinical reasoning, more research is warranted. Conclusions: New insights about team-based simulations and situation awareness were identified as integral for development of clinical reasoning in the context of simulation. More consistent use of terminology in the context of simulation research is also recommended.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom103220
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNurse Education in Practice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3901
dc.titleEffectiveness of using simulation in the development of clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing students: A systematic review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationTheobald, KA; Tutticci, N; Ramsbotham, J; Johnston, S, Effectiveness of using simulation in the development of clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing students: A systematic review, Nurse Education in Practice, 2021, 57, pp. 103220
dc.date.updated2021-11-21T05:20:55Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorTutticci, Naomi


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